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Indication of End of world

Kaustubh G Sharma
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Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 1277

Last Friday we've experience heavy rain and storm which was very rare in summer. Do anyone of you having any experience like this? Please let me know, if you do. I need to catch a ship in china or take off to capetown :P


No Kaustubh No Fun, Know Kaustubh Know Fun..
Sumit Patil
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 25, 2009
Posts: 296

Hey,
I have been witnessing the same odd things right from the start of this year 2012. I tried a lot to ignore all those, but these events are never ending especially in 2012 .


Thanks & Regards, Sumeet
SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 5, LinkedIn Profile
Hussein Baghdadi
clojure forum advocate
Bartender

Joined: Nov 08, 2003
Posts: 3479

Blame it on HAARP.
Tim Moores
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Joined: Sep 21, 2011
Posts: 2408
It's the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine.
Greg Charles
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 01, 2001
Posts: 2853
    
  11

It's starting to be commonly recognized that the weather is getting weirder. There are a few possibilities:

-- The confirmation bias fallacy. Once the idea is put out there, any weird weather is immediately noted as confirmation of the idea and any normal weather is forgotten.

-- Increasing population. We tend to judge the severity of destructive weather by how damage it causes. Denser populations, and populations living in danger zones that might have remained uninhabited before multiply the effects of natural disasters. Paving roads and building levees also increase floods and flood damage downstream.

-- The supernatural. I.e., the world really is coming to an end.

-- The natural. I.e., climate change is starting to bite us in the ass. As I understand it though, the scientific evidence for a link between climate change and extreme weather events is still weak. Given that a stunning number of people still believe global warming is all a hoax even when presented with simple line graphs showing global average temperatures going up, I doubt this is going to be a popular theory.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16137
    
  21

I can't believe that someone named Sharma would be unused to torrential summer rains. Yes, I know that India is an entire subcontinent and even has a few desert-like areas, but it's also famous for its monsoons. He must live in New Jersey. Or maybe Old Jersey (UK), since "summer" there seems to start in May rather than at the solstice like we count it here.

Although this last week was a raining-sideways week where I live (about the same latitude as Delhi). And May is typically the one month of the year I have to water my lawn on a frequent basis.

Greg Charles wrote:
-- The natural. I.e., climate change is starting to bite us in the ass. As I understand it though, the scientific evidence for a link between climate change and extreme weather events is still weak. Given that a stunning number of people still believe global warming is all a hoax even when presented with simple line graphs showing global average temperatures going up, I doubt this is going to be a popular theory.


Some people are so addicted to their ideologies that they'd rather die horribly and take the entire rest of the world with them than admit that they could have been even the teensiest bit wrong. Call it Pride, call it insecurity. Whatever. There are still a stunning number of people that believe that a spherical Earth is a hoax, and they don't even have major industries with an agenda or Big Brothers on the radio to tell them to believe it.

One elephant doesn't make a circus, although we've lined up 2 or 3 of them by now. I almost broke down and switched on air conditioning this last January, and for me that's saying something. My idea of "room temperature" is about 83°F/27C. Still, it could all reverse tomorrow. I just happen to be of the opinion that's it's more prudent to assume that it won't and prepare accordingly.

I long for the bold Captains of Industry of the 1940s and 50s. People like Walt Disney who when presented with a problem developed solutions (albeit often imperfect ones) and made money off them. It seems like today all we have are helplessly weeping victim-types who can only make money by playing games with exotic financial instruments and merger/acquisition activity or keeping to the same old oil addictions that eventually are going to bite us even if Global Warming turned out to be a false alarm after all.
Sumit Bisht
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Joined: Jul 02, 2008
Posts: 329

Tim Holloway wrote: I have to water my lawn on a frequent basis.

Atleast you need to do this only frequently. My lawn has dried and I only water plants & flowers daily (otherwise they'll wilt within few days) as the water supply is not that good.
The weather at daytime is a breezy 47C and hovers around 30 during evening.
But these are least of my concerns as the petrol(Gasoline) prices in India have increased 10% since today. So, it is indeed the end of world
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16137
    
  21

Sumit Bisht wrote:
Tim Holloway wrote: I have to water my lawn on a frequent basis.

Atleast you need to do this only frequently. My lawn has dried and I only water plants & flowers daily (otherwise they'll wilt within few days) as the water supply is not that good.
The weather at daytime is a breezy 47C and hovers around 30 during evening.
But these are least of my concerns as the petrol(Gasoline) prices in India have increased 10% since today. So, it is indeed the end of world


The humidity in the state where I live is so high (where no point is more than about 150 miles/330km from the ocean) that people would die if the temperatures ran in that range. 40 is about the record here, and this is one of the hotter areas. Oddly, the recorded maxima actually decline as one moves closer to the equator.

Since I made my remarks I, too have been hit by an early monsoon, so I guess I won't be watering in May this year. Actually, when I say "frequently" there's a restriction. We're currently limited to 2 days a week in Summer and then only in the morning/evenings. We are surrounded by water, but since it's all salt we primarily rely on a groundwater flow from points North and West and that is under heavy demand these days. Some localities have resorted to "stealing" water from other localities and it has become more and more popular to employ recycled water for institutional irrigation.

We're subject to a progression of cold fronts coming from Northwest to Southeast over the Winter months, but in Summer that's replaced by a "water engine". The sun is nearly vertical (parts of the state are actually in the tropics), it boils water out of the lakes, rivers, soil, plants and surrounding oceans, which then rapidly ascends to the cold heights of the stratosphere (often re-routing air traffic as a result), then condensing and falling as heavy rainfall. A cycle that repeats daily until the atmosphere begins to cool in mid/late September and it all falls out at once. Before air conditioning became commonplace, these cooling daily showers were about all that made the place endurable for half the year.

Speaking of the water engine, some people thought that the failure of last year's hurricane predictions to pan out was meaningful. They weren't paying attention. One thing I've noticed over the years is that the tropical weather systems tend to follow a certain pattern which shifts each year. Last year was an unusual one in that many of the storm systems formed directly over the state instead of over the open sea. That meant that while they did show a certain typical breadth and rotary characteristics, the interfering land kept them from compacting and forming a true "eye" storm. So we actually did have about the predicted number of systems form, they just were prevented from developing to full strength by geography.

The first tropical storm of the season arrived early this year (although not unusually so). It was a puny little thing that formed Northeast of us, dropped down to due East, started to wander back North again and faded without fanfare.
Tim McGuire
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Joined: Apr 30, 2003
Posts: 820

Speaking of the end of the world, I just finished The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. It is set more than 100 years from now in a Bangkok, Thailand that maintains a sea wall and massive pumps to stave off the rising sea. It features all of the end of the world scenarios: Climate Change, Hydrocarbon depletion, rampant plagues, resource wars, and genetic experiments run amok. While it does have some wild sci-fi elements, it is one sci-fi book that I've read and said, "Yeah, I could see things going down like this".

One of the most interesting features of the book is that the "Environment Ministry" is the most powerful and popular government entity. Their roving gangs of "white shirts" are seen as heroes and have ultimate power over all human activity. They crack down on illegal methane use, lax food preparation, foreign corporations, and illegal immigration. This was predicted by Tim Flannery in the nonfiction book "The Weather Makers". He said that at some point, climate change will become scary enough that humans will rush to institute some sort of "carbon dictatorship" with vast regulatory powers. So, I like to ask climate deniers to choose between reasonable carbon controls now and this future carbon dictatorship.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16137
    
  21

Tim McGuire wrote:... He said that at some point, climate change will become scary enough that humans will rush to institute some sort of "carbon dictatorship" with vast regulatory powers. So, I like to ask climate deniers to choose between reasonable carbon controls now and this future carbon dictatorship.


Oh don't be an alarmist. Next you'll be suggesting that a single terrorist attack would panic the nation enough to make them create a "Fatherland Security Department" or some such agency with powers to shake everyone down when they travel within national boundaries. Or a system of internments that effectively nullifies the judicial processes designed and set in place by the very founders of the USA.

Pat Farrell
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Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Tim Holloway wrote:l be suggesting that a single terrorist attack would panic the nation enough to make them create a "Fatherland Security Department" or some such agency with powers to shake everyone down when they travel within national boundaries. Or a system of internments that effectively nullifies the judicial processes designed and set in place by the very founders of the USA.


Good thing that this would only happen in The Onion, and not in the real world of America.
Tim Holloway
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Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16137
    
  21

Indeed. Back when I was young and we were all worried that Satanically-blessed atheistic Communists would invade and brainwash us into repeating whatever their Big Brother said, I was told that one of the things that made us a free country instead of helpless slaves was our ability to travel without having to present out papers or be interrogated.

Oh wait. I think I'm late for the Rush Limbaugh show.
Frank Silbermann
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Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1387
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