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To use or not to use an IDE

John Paterson
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 12, 2012
Posts: 121
Hi guys,

I am asking out of curiosity. It is recomended on page 25 of the B&S OCP Java SE6 Programmer Practice Exams that one should refrain from using an IDE while preparing for the exams. How many of you here, especially those who have cleared the exams, actually did that and found it benefical?

regards
John
Syed Muhammad Nayyar Mustafa
Greenhorn

Joined: May 02, 2012
Posts: 11

it depends on how much time you have to prepare
I used ide because I had around 17 days to prepare for it in my situation
your situation might be different so decide based on that
I will personally suggest using javac for classpath stuff and some ide for the rest
dennis deems
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 12, 2011
Posts: 808
Syed Muhammad Nayyar Mustafa wrote:I will personally suggest using javac for classpath stuff and some ide for the rest

This is what I did. Eclipse's debugging interface was particularly helpful to me in understanding certain things like inheritance, and the order of initialization. Still, I would ONLY recommend this approach if you have previous experience using Java with the command line.
saloni jhanwar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2012
Posts: 583

John Paterson wrote:Hi guys,

I am asking out of curiosity. It is recomended on page 25 of the B&S OCP Java SE6 Programmer Practice Exams that one should refrain from using an IDE while preparing for the exams. How many of you here, especially those who have cleared the exams, actually did that and found it benefical?

regards
John


You can use EditPlus3


Tell the difficulties that i am difficult.
John Jai
Bartender

Joined: May 31, 2011
Posts: 1776
Also Notepad++, if you use Windows.
Harish Tam
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 17, 2005
Posts: 71

Yes, NotePad++ is very cool and free tool that you can use for java Development.


SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4
Sam Hazim
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 19, 2011
Posts: 26
I would recommend using an IDE, but turn off some (most) of the content assist/realtime compilation options. Especially if you are wanting to learn some of the API heavy topics like IO.

Also be very careful with Eclipse in particular - there are some elements of the Java compiler it uses that differentiates itself from the Oracle Javac. I can't remember the issues I had but I have a feeling it was something quirky with compile time constants and implicit conversions (widening or narrowing).
John Paterson
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 12, 2012
Posts: 121
Thanks guys
dennis deems
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 12, 2011
Posts: 808
Sam Hazim wrote:Also be very careful with Eclipse in particular - there are some elements of the Java compiler it uses that differentiates itself from the Oracle Javac. I can't remember the issues I had but I have a feeling it was something quirky with compile time constants and implicit conversions (widening or narrowing).


I never experienced quirks with either of these things. My compilation results were always exactly what they should be. I never observed results in Eclipse that were at variance with what I should experience using javac and the command line. All I noticed were differences in the accompanying text of compiler errors; Eclipse's messages are generally more useful than the vanilla Java compiler.
gurpeet singh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 04, 2012
Posts: 924
    
    1

Dennis Deems wrote:
Sam Hazim wrote:Also be very careful with Eclipse in particular - there are some elements of the Java compiler it uses that differentiates itself from the Oracle Javac. I can't remember the issues I had but I have a feeling it was something quirky with compile time constants and implicit conversions (widening or narrowing).


I never experienced quirks with either of these things. My compilation results were always exactly what they should be. I never observed results in Eclipse that were at variance with what I should experience using javac and the command line. All I noticed were differences in the accompanying text of compiler errors; Eclipse's messages are generally more useful than the vanilla Java compiler.



i faced problems with eclipse too. at times it keeps showing up compiler error and after ruining so many hours we come to realise that we just have to restart eclipse and the same code works fine. i wonder why it happens in eclipse.
Praveen Kumar M K
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 256
gurpeet singh wrote:i faced problems with eclipse too. at times it keeps showing up compiler error and after ruining so many hours we come to realise that we just have to restart eclipse and the same code works fine. i wonder why it happens in eclipse.


This happens usually when Eclipse is not able to build a project(or a program) properly. It might be due to several reasons, but the solution remains the same - When the compiler error is cryptic or wrong, clean and build your programs. The "clean" part erases the current class files thereby starting with fresh copies.
Yalvin Duha
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 07, 2012
Posts: 40

The usage of an IDE, such as Eclipse or Netbeans, for the new comers is discouraged, because those tools can provide a whole lot of automation, i.e. auto-completion of API methods which you should memorize for the exam, or simply flagging compile-time errors in the environment so the developer corrects them right on spot.

You are preparing for an exam that none of these beneficial tools will be provided, so over times, their usage would make your brain become lazy and instill a bad habit of relying on them to help you overcome certain errors. Moreover, certain IDE's use their own compiler and error messages can be slightly more descriptive than an actual compile or run-time errors run outside of such environments. Therefore, you have to make sure that the compile-time and run-time versions are set to point to the "Oracle's" version which you are taking the test for.

Nonetheless, I use Eclipse to write all my codes which allows me to organize the packages and new classes really quickly. But that's where I stop. What I do is, I let the IDE generates a skeleton of my code, then I augment my own codes related to a particular topic, compile, and run the programs in a separate console in a regressive fashion. Of course, you have to make sure the environment setting in which the console runs in is compatible with the JVM you are taking the test for (even though it might not be any difference, don't try to run a code destined for OCPJP 6 with JVM 7).
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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