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how did authors learned java before publishing HFS or OCJP books

Vishal Hegde
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Joined: Aug 01, 2009
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how did authors learned java before publishing HFS or OCJP books. Google too might be difficult at that point of time


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Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
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Books existed before HF and SCJP. The first Java book I can find is dated 1995. Do you mean how did the very first Java developers/authors learn Java? I would imagine by reading the spec or by contributing to writing Java itself or by early people who digest the spec and put out examples.


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Vishal Hegde
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But the previous books must not be brain friendly.how did they managed to grasp those concepts and in future presented to us in a simplified mannerk
Henry Wong
author
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Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18896
    
  40

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Books existed before HF and SCJP. The first Java book I can find is dated 1995. Do you mean how did the very first Java developers/authors learn Java? I would imagine by reading the spec or by contributing to writing Java itself or by early people who digest the spec and put out examples.


I started in Java in 1994 -- actually before the language was called Java (so, pre-Java 1.0). Interestingly, JavaDoc was somewhat available, but it wasn't all too clear. There were definitely a ton of trial and error going on -- to try to figure out how everything worked.

Vishal Hegde wrote:But the previous books must not be brain friendly.how did they managed to grasp those concepts and in future presented to us in a simplified manner


In your career, not everything you will do will have good documentation, not everything you will do will have a clear goal. You will just have to work with what is available.

Henry

Books: Java Threads, 3rd Edition, Jini in a Nutshell, and Java Gems (contributor)
Bert Bates
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Joined: Oct 14, 2002
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    5
A lot of our background (Kathy's a LOT, mine some), came from teaching before writing.

In general I recommend to all authors that they teach a topic to live, skeptical students before they write about the topic. Trial by fire...


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Gaurangkumar Khalasi
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Henry Wong wrote:In your career, not everything you will do will have good documentation, not everything you will do will have a clear goal. You will just have to work with what is available.

Anayonkar Shivalkar
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Joined: Dec 08, 2010
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    5

Vishal Hegde wrote:But the previous books must not be brain friendly.how did they managed to grasp those concepts and in future presented to us in a simplified mannerk

JLS (Java Language Specification) is one of the most brain-friendly and the definitive material for Core Java.


Regards,
Anayonkar Shivalkar (SCJP, SCWCD, OCMJD, OCEEJBD)
Vishal Hegde
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Joined: Aug 01, 2009
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Bert Bates wrote:A lot of our background (Kathy's a LOT, mine some), came from teaching before writing.

In general I recommend to all authors that they teach a topic to live, skeptical students before they write about the topic. Trial by fire...



That makes sense...teaching others makes yourself an expert thats why you people are true experts... Thanks a lot Bert and Kathy for making me aware of Cognitive and for this Awesome Book
William P O'Sullivan
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Joined: Mar 28, 2012
Posts: 859

I too started very very early. I remember demoing the bouncing Duke's head applet to a university.
I remember saying "This is the future!". I even had a successful startup converting mainframe CICS
screens to Java applets communicating with sockets!!

Anyway, I learned very early from www.sun.com (sniff) and dissecting the examples.

WP
Jayesh A Lalwani
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Joined: Jan 17, 2008
Posts: 2402
    
  28

Vishal Hegde wrote:But the previous books must not be brain friendly.how did they managed to grasp those concepts and in future presented to us in a simplified mannerk


Well, it;s obvious isn't it?. They are just smarter than you are :p

Just j/king. I think a lot of us who have learnt java from the beginning had an easier time, because when Java started it wasn't as comprehensive as it is now. When Java started, there was core java, AWT, IO and applets (I think).. That's it. That's all we had to learn. Then came Servlets, JSP. and RMI. then came web service, EL, EJB, and so on and then it just exploded. We had a easier time learning Java because we swallowed it in bite sized pieces, instead of the whole thing that. I remember when the whole JDK fit on a floppy disk. One floppy and notepad. That's all was needed to learn Java. Not only did Java fit neatly in a floppy, It fit neatly in our heads too.

Vishal Hegde
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Joined: Aug 01, 2009
Posts: 1055

William P O'Sullivan wrote:I too started very very early. I remember demoing the bouncing Duke's head applet to a university.
I remember saying "This is the future!". I even had a successful startup converting mainframe CICS
screens to Java applets communicating with sockets!!

Anyway, I learned very early from www.sun.com (sniff) and dissecting the examples.

WP


So you learnt it the hard way, nobody was there to mentor you or you never thought anybody...

The reason I am asking you because unless anybody is pressurising me or speaking me in an hard tone, I am like a Lazy Lion gazing even though deer is very near to me
Greg Charles
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Joined: Oct 01, 2001
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  11

A lot of us "old-timers" came from a C++ background, so we (sort of, supposedly) understood OOP concepts and much of Java's syntax as well. Java actually appeared as a simplification to us: no pointers, no h files, no multiple inheritance, a standard String class, well-defined primitives, built-in synchronization, and on and on. Remember too, the API wasn't nearly so big in those days, so there wasn't so much to learn. Of course that meant we were using Vectors and Enumerations for everything, but it was all simple and fun and new. We felt like were getting in on the ground floor of the future, which as it turns out of course, we were.
 
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