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need suggestions.was told to I will be sent onsite but betrayed by dirty politics.

Monica. Shiralkar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 07, 2012
Posts: 644
I was told i will be going onsite but at the last moment they sent some other person newly recruited to onsite. Since last few months my PM and TL kept telling be i will be going onsite and keep up with good work.I kept doing so but was betrayeidNow they are saying will try next time in some other project as here is no onsite opportunity.I am feeling cheated beacuase of politics. Now I need suggestions: Is it possible to be directly be recruited by company which sends you onsite?I am from India and work on j2ee..Can someone suggest me way to go abroad for work directly?
chris webster
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Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1703
    
  14

Well, maybe it was "politics" or maybe the other person was just more suited to the on-site role than you. Either way, your employer is paying your salary, so they have a right to decide who they put on each project. You say they will "try next time", so you can either decide to trust them on this, or look for another job that will give you what you want.

As for working abroad, I'm guessing you mean somewhere like the USA, Europe or Australia, right? If so, then you have exactly the same options as anybody else from another country who doesn't have a work permit.

You can apply for jobs with Indian-based companies or multi-national consultancies that also have offices in your target country, and hope you can get moved to an offshore office or project - as you have been trying to do with your current employer. For example, there are around 30,000 Indian IT workers in the UK right now on "intra-company transfer" (ICT) arrangements i.e. brought into the UK by their employers, and the USA has similar arrangements, so maybe you will find a way in via this route (although there is also a trend - here in the UK at least - for IT jobs to go to India instead). Of course, you'd need to make sure they will pay you enough to live in the other country - an Indian salary won't go far in an expensive American or European city.

Or you can start researching employers in your target country and figure how to persuade them that your skills are so valuable that they will apply for a work permit on your behalf to allow you to work for them directly. Of course, you may find that applying for a job with a US or European employer directly means you no longer have the advantage of being seen as "cheap labour", as in many countries they may be required (quite rightly) to pay you the same as a local employee, so you'd have to make a strong case based on your skills and experience. You'd probably need a good command of the local language as well.

You could also explore the option of studying in your target country e.g. take a master's course, as some countries allow foreign graduates of their universities to work there for a few years after graduation.

Whichever route you choose, getting a job in somebody else's country is a privilege, not a right, so if you want to do this, you need to focus on how to present your case in the most positive way, rather than complaining about "dirty politics".

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chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1703
    
  14

chris webster wrote:... there are around 30,000 Indian IT workers in the UK right now on "intra-company transfer" (ICT) arrangements...

Sorry - turns out that was the wrong figure. Real figure is apparently around 15,000 at the moment (down from last year), although there is talk of relaxing the regulations to increase the number of ICTs in the near future.
Monica. Shiralkar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 07, 2012
Posts: 644
Thanks Chris for such detailed explaination..I want to know about option 1. How to search for ONLY such jobs..i mean only jobs I mean ICT where they can send me aborad?...If I leave my present organisation for another comapny which promises this ICT is it not risky...
Jeanne Boyarsky
internet detective
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Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30515
    
150

Monica. Shiralkar wrote:If I leave my present organisation for another comapny which promises this ICT is it not risky...

Anything is risky. You don't know if the new place will give you an onsite either. But you know your current won't so are you worse off?


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chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1703
    
  14

Monica. Shiralkar wrote:Thanks Chris for such detailed explaination..I want to know about option 1. How to search for ONLY such jobs..i mean only jobs I mean ICT where they can send me aborad?...If I leave my present organisation for another comapny which promises this ICT is it not risky...

Well, I really don't know how people in India get placed in ICT roles here in the UK (although I suspect it isn't based exclusively on talent/experience), so maybe your fellow Indian JavaRanchers can offer some tips here. Incidentally, "ICT" ("intra-company transfer") is the UK term, but the equivalent roles will be described differently and obviously come under different visa regulations in other countries e.g. the USA.

One question you should ask yourself is why you are so desperate for an on-site role?

What do you hope to gain from this, and what can you offer your employer and - more importantly- their clients if they do send you to work on-site? If it's just a CV-building exercise for yourself, then it may well be your employers have spotted this and don't want to risk putting somebody on-site if that person is not going to focus on the client's needs rather than their own. Also, if you know why you want to work on-site and what you can offer, you may find it easier to "join the dots" between your goals and those of your employer and their clients, so that you can persuade them you are the right person for an on-site role.

Finally, if working abroad is really so important to you, then maybe you should try applying directly to employers in your target country by the front door, instead of relying on the back door ICT route. But if job security is more important to you than risking everything to work abroad, then maybe you will have to accept it's not going to happen right now, and get on with building your career at home in the meantime.
arulk pillai
Author
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Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3219
It is also worth having a chat with your manager before jumping the gun. Many problems are solved with proper negotiations.


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Monica. Shiralkar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 07, 2012
Posts: 644
manager never says no for anything..he says yeah it will happen.it will happen but when..
arulk pillai
Author
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Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3219
So, you need to decide what you want to do. You will have to look after yourself. Ask yourself the question --> Are you feeling stagnated?
 
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subject: need suggestions.was told to I will be sent onsite but betrayed by dirty politics.