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Rating A Industry Standard Java Developer

 
Rajiv Jain
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Hi

First of all sorry. I am not sure where to ask this question.

Is there a way to rate a Java Developer based on industry standard. For example:

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

So in each of these levels, there are certain things that a Java Developer must meet.

What I actually mean is there some sort of system or something that we can rate a Java Developer based on industry standard? So a Java Developer meets certain things to be a Level 3.

I think the question is: What do recruiters use to grade individuals?

Actually, my company has this level system but for IT people in mind and isn't aimed for Developers. Is there something for a Developer?
 
Pat Farrell
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I think this idea is really bad. What is the purpose? You are hiring a person to work together with you on a team to build great software. Why treat them as a cog in a machine? Why treat them as if they were replaceable by any other "level 2" person?

I would not work at any place that was this dehumanizing.
 
naved momin
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Rajiv Jain wrote:Hi

First of all sorry. I am not sure where to ask this question.

Is there a way to rate a Java Developer based on industry standard. For example:

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

So in each of these levels, there are certain things that a Java Developer must meet.

What I actually mean is there some sort of system or something that we can rate a Java Developer based on industry standard? So a Java Developer meets certain things to be a Level 3.

I think the question is: What do recruiters use to grade individuals?

Actually, my company has this level system but for IT people in mind and isn't aimed for Developers. Is there something for a Developer?

pat is right...i totally agree,
I think there is no need to rate people on levels at least not to programmers...because we are standing on sand which is Continuously shifting , so if level 3 person didn't learn new techniques at right time then soon he/she will fall in the category of level 1, better is to find a employee which is willing to change as per the needs i.e learning new things etc etc
 
Rajiv Jain
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The problem is that I can't leave, well I can. Actaully, I am a Junior Developer. I am Certified in Java (SCJP) but I am getting experience from the company.

Any ideas?
 
Rajiv Jain
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Also, I am learning every day on new technhologies.
 
Winston Gutkowski
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Rajiv Jain wrote:Any ideas?

Are you enjoying yourself? If so, then stay - a job in the hand is worth two in the bush.

SCJP is certainly a recognised "accomplishment", but how much weight it has I don't know. Probably not a vast amount. The next "level", app-wise, would probably be SCJD (I have no idea what Oracle calls it these days), which I suspect carries a bit more; but again, I have no idea how much - probably a lot more if you're applying to Oracle for a job than it might do elsewhere.

My advice - learn stuff and get good; don't worry about "levels".

Winston
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
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I can think of two ways this is useful and both are internal to a company:
1) Performance appraisals
2) Recruiting to talk about candidates across teams. Fit still matters but it provides a language to talk about perception of skills
 
Pat Farrell
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I can see that the concept might be useful. Say its the anual review, you can say

Jeanne is doing well for a senior developer
or
Pat is not picking up new technologies as quickly as we'd expect an intermediate developer to do.

But I can't see that having hard level definitions helps. YMMV, IMHO, etc.
 
Paul Anilprem
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Rajiv Jain wrote:Hi

First of all sorry. I am not sure where to ask this question.

Is there a way to rate a Java Developer based on industry standard. For example:

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

So in each of these levels, there are certain things that a Java Developer must meet.

What I actually mean is there some sort of system or something that we can rate a Java Developer based on industry standard? So a Java Developer meets certain things to be a Level 3.

I think the question is: What do recruiters use to grade individuals?

Actually, my company has this level system but for IT people in mind and isn't aimed for Developers. Is there something for a Developer?


Oracle is doing exactly the same thing with their java certifications by grouping them into levels - Associate, Professional, and Expert, where Associate is your level 1. There can be several such grading agencies but Oracle Certifications are by far the most recognized and most accepted.

There is no industry standard that recruiters use. Some take Oracle Certifications as well and some don't care about any certifications/exams at all. Many recruiters ask the candidate to take an online exam before they submit the resume to the client for a position. There are several companies that offer such candidate evaluation exams.
 
arulk pillai
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I have worked a few companies now, and not once have I been asked about the certification or level. I basically go through a company's basic recruitment process involving

1. Technical tests
2. Face to face technical interview
3. Face to face HR interview.

Also found that cultivating good resume writing, job hunting, interviewing, and networking skills are far more beneficial than just getting certified alone. I also work with some of the accomplished developers who are not certified. So, it depends on what works for an individual.
 
Pat Farrell
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arulk pillai wrote: good resume writing, job hunting, interviewing, and networking skills are far more beneficial


I can't speak to other countries, but in the US, assorted certificates are not important in most job interviews.

I agree with @arulk, a good resume is critical and needed to get to the next stage: interviewing.
If you can't articulate what you've done, what you are interested in, and why you will help the company, that is the end of the interview when I give them.

Most important, no matter what else, is networking skills. Using networking gives you a huge leg up even if your resume and interview skills are not top of the line.
 
arulk pillai
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Your online presence is equally important via blogging, linkedIn, online portfolio, etc as part of your networking and showing off your skills and accomplishments.
 
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