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Lightweight Debian Based Distro

Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 15299
    
    6

I need to run linux in vmware fusion on my macbook. I want to keep it as light weight as possible but need the UI. I'm considering xubuntu but open to suggestions. I don't want a full blown Gnome or KDE. But I also don't want to spend hours installing and configuring it.


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Anayonkar Shivalkar
Bartender

Joined: Dec 08, 2010
Posts: 1509
    
    5

Gregg Bolinger wrote:I need to run linux in vmware fusion on my macbook. I want to keep it as light weight as possible but need the UI. I'm considering xubuntu but open to suggestions. I don't want a full blown Gnome or KDE. But I also don't want to spend hours installing and configuring it.

You can give a try to PuppyLinux. Its really lightweight and supports Synaptic package manager.

On rare occasions, when something goes wrong in my machine and I'm in hurry, I always prefer PuppyLinux live CD. Its pretty fast.

Also, you can try Bodhi Linux - it is also quite lightweight.

IMHO, GUI stuff contributes more to 'weight', so even your own favorite Linux distro can be made lightweight by disabling unused services and using a lightweight desktop environment like XFCE/LXDE etc.

I hope this helps.


Regards,
Anayonkar Shivalkar (SCJP, SCWCD, OCMJD, OCEEJBD)
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16145
    
  21

A number of people have been running wheezy on the Raspberry pi computer.

Several years back, I created an IMPL cd image using Damn Small Linux, which ran to about 46MB on the CD.

IMPL for those not familiar with IBM mainframes stands for "Initial Microprogram Load". One of the first uses of the original 8-inch floppy disk drives was to hold the IMPL image for certain IBM System/370 processors, since IBM's hardware back then was implemented by microprogramming the physical hardware to support the System/370 instruction set. So you would load in the diskette, push a button, and then IPL (boot) your favorite IBM mainframe OS. I just brought the process up to date, replacing the floppy with a mini-cd and using the Hercules mainframe emulation software for the System/370 "microcode". So pop in the CD, press RESET and voilĂ ! Instant Mainframe! With slightly better diagnostic tools than IBM could supply back then.


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subject: Lightweight Debian Based Distro