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Which IDE is recommended?

Alex Petsche
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 29, 2012
Posts: 42

I've been learning java through netbeans as it was what my teacher wanted us to use, but I've heard eclipse is the "standard" one to use. I was just wondering why is this and would it be better to learn on that instead of netbeans if it is the more popular IDE to use. I mainly ask because I was wondering if it made a big difference which IDE you use or if it's all personal preference.
Kemal Sokolovic
Bartender

Joined: Jun 19, 2010
Posts: 825
    
    5

As for IDE, there is no "standard" one. I also prefer using NetBeans, but also use Eclipse in some occasions. I don't know which one is used more than the other, but both of them are very good IDEs.
An IDE is there just to make development easier to you because it integrates tools (source code editor, compiler and interpreter, debugger, etc.) that you would have to use separately. And choosing the right one can be a really difficult, especially if you just started with programming and decide to use one as you're not yet sure what your needs are.

So what I would suggest is you use text editor and shell for some time at the beginning, to make the best of learning language. Later try both of these IDEs (or even some third, like BlueJ) and see which one suits your needs best. And remember, there is no such thing as Ultimate IDE, it's the matter of your choice (or sometimes company rule). It's important to be productive, not to follow the majority.


The quieter you are, the more you are able to hear.
Pyla Rao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 10, 2012
Posts: 50
Basically both netbeans and eclipse are very popular because these both are free. And Ultimately its your choice to choosing the IDE. But Personally i preferred NetBeans why because its comes with every thing like built in support for all. for suppose if want develop any app using struts then there no need to do extra things like eclipse. But in eclipse first need to download flug-in and install it. So some cases netbeans better but if write coding every IDE is same.

But First as beginner, its better to not using IDE's.
Alex Petsche
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 29, 2012
Posts: 42

I've tried eclispse a little and the immediate difference I noticed between netbeans and it (unless I just did something wrong) was that it didn't auto generate code such as the main method and such whlie netbeans did. Both seemed to work fine for what I would be using them for. Thanks for the replies though it cleared up my misconceptions.

I am still wondering why you would recommend learning in a text editor and then using an IDE? I understand that it would make you think harder as the IDE isn't "holding your hand" with every little error it finds. Would I be at too much of a loss if I did learn using an IDE over a text editor?

Also the only reason I started with netbeans was that my teacher recommended us to use it in class as that was what he was using to show us examples.
Martin Vajsar
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 22, 2010
Posts: 3611
    
  60

Alex Petsche wrote:I am still wondering why you would recommend learning in a text editor and then using an IDE? I understand that it would make you think harder as the IDE isn't "holding your hand" with every little error it finds. Would I be at too much of a loss if I did learn using an IDE over a text editor?

It's not only that the IDE generates the code for you, although this can play some role too, because you at least see the code that was generated.

Much more important is that the IDE also creates build scripts, sets class paths and project dependencies and you don't ever get to see how there thinks work or look like, unless you specifically look for them (most people usually don't). For more complicated projects you might need to review or modify these and you may well find out that you've no clue of what the IDE did and how to change that.

I was in this situation and it took me some time to be able to create scripts that would compile a project outside of IDE (so that I could automate the build process), for example .
Paul Clapham
Bartender

Joined: Oct 14, 2005
Posts: 18987
    
    8

Alex Petsche wrote:Also the only reason I started with netbeans was that my teacher recommended us to use it in class as that was what he was using to show us examples.


Networking effects like this are a very good reason to choose a product. Just like if you were in an environment where people were sending you PowerPoint presentations to review and modify, you'd install PowerPoint rather than some other presentation tool.
Alex Petsche
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 29, 2012
Posts: 42

Thanks for the advice! It sounds like the general consensus is to learn how the compiling, class directories, and package directories (if I'm saying this right) work, but to then "Check it" by writing it in netbeans, so that the "network" is the same which is what Paul Clapham pointed out in his power point example.

I do have one question though where would be a good place to start learning what these "dependencies" are and how they work? Also would it be a good idea to start looking into this or wait until after I've finished my intro to java programming class? I think I've got a good grasp on the basics, but I still have some trouble with GUI, array's, and sometimes understanding the API.
Ivan Jozsef Balazs
Rancher

Joined: May 22, 2012
Posts: 905
    
    5
Alex Petsche wrote:I am still wondering why you would recommend learning in a text editor and then using an IDE?


This was replied nicely, but let me add my wording.

There is the underlying stuff which you must learn sooner or later anyway: dependencies, classpath, class loading, packaging issues etc. The exclusive use of an IDE would preclude your learning them and you would learn the IDE's intricacies instead.

Alex Petsche
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 29, 2012
Posts: 42

Thanks for the added info. I've already had a few issues when the IDE automatically setting the classpath and then I moved the file location...pain in the butt to figure that one out haha, but I eventually got it.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
 
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