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Schildt v Horton

Sayth renshaw
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Joined: Apr 17, 2011
Posts: 34
There are 2 beginning books out there the wrox Horton beginning java isbn 0470404140 and the 5th edition java a beginners guide isbn 0071606327 by Schildt.

Can't really afford to buy both and have trouble splitting them, has anyone used either of these and could share an opinion?

Jeff Verdegan
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Joined: Jan 03, 2004
Posts: 6109
    
    6

I don't know anything about the Horton book, but I would recommend strongly against Schildt. I've seen a lot of stuff posted on this and other forums that stemmed from errors in the Schildt book.

There are a couple others that I know have good reputations, though I haven't read them myself.

http://www.headfirstlabs.com/books/hfjava/
http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Java-2nd-Joshua-Bloch/dp/0321356683
Thinking In Java by Bruce Eckel. I think there's a free version of this online.
And of course Oracle's online tutorials: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/
Sayth renshaw
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Joined: Apr 17, 2011
Posts: 34
I have done the oracle trail and that's where I am looking to go from. The Bloch book I believe is for more experienced programmers.

Horton has written lots of books most seem to have good review.
Anayonkar Shivalkar
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Joined: Dec 08, 2010
Posts: 1456
    
    5

Hi Sayth,

I would agree with Jeff. If you don't have any experience with Java, then Head First Java, and Thinking in Java are good books.

If you come from C++ background, or having working knowledge about OO principles, then Core Java (Vol I & II) are very good (please note that those are huge books and expensive compared to previously mentioned books).

I haven't read Horton's book, but I won't recommend Schildt's book.

Further, though Effective Java is an excellent book - please note that it is book for programmers hoping to write better programs(just like Effective C++ by Meyers). That book is not meant to teach Java from basics - so please don't refer it as your first Java book.

If you are a total newbie, and want to buy only one book for now - then I would recommend Head First Java.

I hope this helps.


Regards,
Anayonkar Shivalkar (SCJP, SCWCD, OCMJD, OCEEJBD)
Phil English
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Joined: Jun 18, 2012
Posts: 62

Sayth renshaw wrote:There are 2 beginning books out there the wrox Horton beginning java isbn 0470404140 and the 5th edition java a beginners guide isbn 0071606327 by Schildt.

Can't really afford to buy both and have trouble splitting them, has anyone used either of these and could share an opinion?



I had the same problem. I moved from years of scripting languages to Java a few months back. I started with Head First which was good but if you have done the trail already you might not get too much out of it. Schildt is not good. I sent mine back.

You are right about Bloch. I bought it about 2-3 months (recreational programming only) after finishing Head First and it was far too advanced in most places for me. Some stuff is useful but you have to sift through a lot of advanced stuff to get it.

In the end I decided that I would just push on with some projects and use the internet to solve problems as I came across them. It is a more organic way of learning which suits me. Helpful if you know people who will review code for you on occasion.

I am considering this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Head-First-Design-Patterns-Freeman/dp/0596007124

My thinking is that, whilst you can learn small scale syntax/vocabulary from the DIY method it probably isn't so good for learning how to properly structure code. I was also considering something on threading but this might be something I can address in the DIY way when it comes up there seems to be a lot of tutorials out there.

Sayth renshaw
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Joined: Apr 17, 2011
Posts: 34
Yeah, I have just spent this year in college and doing ASP web. So learning SQL server 2008, VB.Net HTML CSS Visual Studio. I might be the odd one out but I don't really like visual studio or vb.net and I found the whole experience underwhelming.

There are the wibit.net video tutorials Wibit.net and just found tutorials point which appears to have a fair deal of info tutorials point and quite a lot of video on freevideolectures.

There are a lot free java books here I am assuming are legitimately free onlineprogrammingbooks.com
 
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