File APIs for Java Developers
Manipulate DOC, XLS, PPT, PDF and many others from your application.
http://aspose.com/file-tools
The moose likes Meaningless Drivel and the fly likes How many tech books you have? Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of Spring in Action this week in the Spring forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Other » Meaningless Drivel
Bookmark "How many tech books you have?" Watch "How many tech books you have?" New topic
Author

How many tech books you have?

Tushar Bhaware
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2012
Posts: 62

In one of the MD topic,Chris Webster wrote that he has 115 tech books on his shelf. That's a huge number. I have meager 7 books. I am just curious how many tech books you guys have? No need of names,Just Number. Rough number will do fine also.


Remember you have not inherited earth from your ancestor,you only borrowed it from your descendants.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

As I posted in the other topic:
Bear wrote:Good grief, I'm afraid to count them. Certainly, the count would be in the hundreds. And if you count those that I've purged over the years, likely over a thousand.

This is the reason I've switched to eBooks lately. I'm drowning in books (I also have tons of novels, cookbooks, How To books, non-tech science non-fiction, and on and on).


[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
Tushar Bhaware
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2012
Posts: 62

Awesome Sir !!! No words for that accomplishment.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

The "purged pile" is large because I have 34 years in the industry.
Tushar Bhaware
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2012
Posts: 62

Bear Bibeault wrote:The "purged pile" is large because I have 34 years in the industry.

I still find it as an amazing achievement. I think, most people will give up reading new books when they have few years of experience and from the number of books you have read, looks like you have never lost the hunger of learning new things. And that's the main Accomplishment.
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Just took a quick snapshot of the book wall in my office.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/the_old_curmudgeon/8218564758/in/photostream
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

Not alphabetized?

That's likely what mine would look like if they were all in one place. They're everywhere!
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Tushar Bhaware wrote:I still find it as an amazing achievement. I think, most people will give up reading new books when they have few years of experience and from the number of books you have read, looks like you have never lost the hunger of learning new things. And that's the main Accomplishment.


I'm a bit older than @bear, I've been at it about 39 years.

To your point of having experience, you have to realize that this industry is alive. When I started, Fortran and Cobol were popular, and 16K of memory cost $50,000 and took up a complete 19" rack.

There will always be new technologies to learn. I sure would not have wanted to spend nearly 40 years doing vintage 1972 Fortran.

I expect that I'll move on to some better language than Java before I retire.
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Bear Bibeault wrote:Not alphabetized?


Its essentially a self optimizing cache. Hot topics, current books are easy arm length. Notice that the Aho, Sethi, Ullman Dragon book is way up on the top shelf.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

Tushar Bhaware wrote:
I still find it as an amazing achievement.

Thanks.

I think, most people will give up reading new books when they have few years of experience and from the number of books you have read, looks like you have never lost the hunger of learning new things.

There's a term for an older software developer who doesn't keep up-to-date with new things: unemployed.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

Pat Farrell wrote:
Bear Bibeault wrote:Not alphabetized?


Its essentially a self optimizing cache. Hot topics, current books are easy arm length. Notice that the Aho, Sethi, Ullman Dragon book is way up on the top shelf.


For me, it's self-optimized by which pile is closer to my desk.
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Bear Bibeault wrote:For me, it's self-optimized by which pile is closer to my desk.


For me, if I don't put them up on a shelf, in an instant, you can't see the top of my desk. When they cover the keyboard and mouse, I have to put them back up.


BTW, love @bear's comment the IT pros who don't keep up with technology are unemployed. So true.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

Pat Farrell wrote:For me, if I don't put them up on a shelf, in an instant, you can't see the top of my desk.

Desks have tops?
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30752
    
156

Probably about 100. I read 10-20 tech books a year. But some are borrowed from the library or co-workers. And some were given away or thrown out for being obsolete. I have 59 tech books at home. Plus about the same - maybe a little less - in the office. Some of the them aren't so relevant to my job though.


[Blog] [JavaRanch FAQ] [How To Ask Questions The Smart Way] [Book Promos]
Blogging on Certs: SCEA Part 1, Part 2 & 3, Core Spring 3, OCAJP, OCPJP beta, TOGAF part 1 and part 2
John Jai
Bartender

Joined: May 31, 2011
Posts: 1776
I have around 12, all bought after joining Javaranch!
John Jai
Bartender

Joined: May 31, 2011
Posts: 1776
Pat Farrell wrote:Just took a quick snapshot of the book wall in my office.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/the_old_curmudgeon/8218564758/in/photostream

Amazing number of books you have.
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1771
    
  14

Tushar Bhaware wrote:I still find it as an amazing achievement. I think, most people will give up reading new books when they have few years of experience and from the number of books you have read, looks like you have never lost the hunger of learning new things. And that's the main Accomplishment.

As Bear and Pat have pointed out, the longer you stay in this industry, the more stuff you have to keep learning so the more books you end up with. Of course, the older you get, the less stuff you can keep in your head, so the more books you need anyway!

As for purging tech books, that's quite hard these days. Technology changes so fast that most software books are out of date within a couple of years, which means nobody else wants them either. I've sold some on Amazon, given some away, but in recent years the only way to get rid of many of them has been to rip them up for paper recycling (at least this is good exercise as the books are fairly chunky) or even burn the darned things. I think I'll have to follow Bear's lead and switch to ebooks in the near future...


No more Blub for me, thank you, Vicar.
Tushar Bhaware
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2012
Posts: 62

Pat Farrell wrote:Just took a quick snapshot of the book wall in my office.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/the_old_curmudgeon/8218564758/in/photostream

that's a lot of book,Sir.
great Collection.

Pat Farrell wrote:There will always be new technologies to learn. I sure would not have wanted to spend nearly 40 years doing vintage 1972 Fortran.

When i started this topic,didn't thought that way. Yeah,One doesn't want to spend his life working on one language when there will be new modern language to do stuff easily.

Bear Bibeault wrote:There's a term for an older software developer who doesn't keep up-to-date with new things: unemployed.

new perspective.Thanks.

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:I read 10-20 tech books a year.

I think i will borrow this habit from you.

finally, i would like to thank
chris webster
for bringing this question to my mind and
all other's who have commented here
for giving me this new perspective.
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11402
    
  16

I have about 20 here in the office, and about 20 more at home. I don't move around much (13 years in the industry, two jobs), and they were/are both slow to change. The tech I use now doesn't really have a lot of books - Amazon shows...none (cloverleaf, anyone?).

I've also found that much of the other stuff I need, google is a terrific reference. Several times a day I look up perl, tcl, or shell script questions and find the answer online. No need for a book (at least at the level I work at).


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
Paul Anilprem
Enthuware Software Support
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 23, 2000
Posts: 3312
    
    7
In one of Sherlock Holmes's books (don't remember which one), Sherlock explains to Dr Watson why he doesn't read a lot of books. His logic is that brain is like a room and information is like furniture. So the more you read the more cluttered our brain gets and it become difficult to find stuff you really need. Hence, he reads only the stuff he needs and only when he needs it.

Has this ever happened with anyone here?


Enthuware - Best Mock Exams and Questions for Oracle/Sun Java Certifications
Quality Guaranteed - Pass or Full Refund!
Tushar Bhaware
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2012
Posts: 62

fred rosenberger wrote:I have about 20 here in the office, and about 20 more at home.

Thank you for trying to calm my nerves. But now i am settled with idea of reading couple of hundred tech books.

fred rosenberger wrote:
I've also found that much of the other stuff I need, google is a terrific reference.

There is famous quote from one of bollywood movie "Jiska koi nahi hota,uska bhagwan hota hai". Rough translation would be "those who don't have anyone, have god with them".
For programmers, we use "those who don't know nothing, Google is with them". Google is best friend to beginners like me.
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11402
    
  16

Tushar Bhaware wrote:Google is best friend to beginners like me.

I would caution you though...there is a lot of garbage out there, too. You need to develop the skill to know what is good information and what is bad, and that mostly comes with experience. There have been many times where I would look at the first (several) hits on google and say to myself "There has GOT to be a better way".
Tushar Bhaware
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2012
Posts: 62

fred rosenberger wrote:I would caution you though...there is a lot of garbage out there, too. "There has GOT to be a better way".
Yes i have found out that in one of forum where i mentioned roseindia is a good website and found out that it contains crappy material. Now i also look for quality content,ask my seniors where they look for stuff,hang out more on JavaRanch.
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1771
    
  14

Tushar Bhaware wrote:Now i also look for quality content,ask my seniors where they look for stuff,hang out more on JavaRanch.

Always a good idea!
Jelle Klap
Bartender

Joined: Mar 10, 2008
Posts: 1768
    
    7

Not that many, and reference books aside, I've not even read all of them. It's hard to pick up a book when you have a PS3 sitting right there, distracting you. Calling you. Pick me, pick me!


Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30752
    
156

Paul Anilprem wrote:In one of Sherlock Holmes's books (don't remember which one), Sherlock explains to Dr Watson why he doesn't read a lot of books. His logic is that brain is like a room and information is like furniture. So the more you read the more cluttered our brain gets and it become difficult to find stuff you really need. Hence, he reads only the stuff he needs and only when he needs it.

Has this ever happened with anyone here?

No. I find my mind is more of a series of pointers. I remember where I read something so I can find it again Then I just need to retain concepts and not details.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

Jelle Klap wrote:It's hard to pick up a book when you have a PS3 sitting right there, distracting you. Calling you. Pick me, pick me!


I'll say! I got Dishonored for my birthday (mid-October) and started playing it a couple of weeks ago, and it's really really hard to put down!

(See. I don't spend all my time geeking out.)
Jelle Klap
Bartender

Joined: Mar 10, 2008
Posts: 1768
    
    7

Bear Bibeault wrote:
Jelle Klap wrote:It's hard to pick up a book when you have a PS3 sitting right there, distracting you. Calling you. Pick me, pick me!


I'll say! I got Dishonored for my birthday (mid-October) and started playing it a couple of weeks ago, and it's really really hard to put down!

(See. I don't spend all my time geeking out.)


Yeah, I've finished Dishonored, it' great!
It reminded me of both Thief and Deus Ex, two of my all time favorite series.
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11402
    
  16

Bear Bibeault wrote:I'll say! I got Dishonored for my birthday (mid-October) and started playing it a couple of weeks ago, and it's really really hard to put down!

(See. I don't spend all my time geeking out.)

Wait...What? Playing video games is NOT geeking out? Since when?
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11402
    
  16

Jelle Klap wrote:It reminded me of both Thief and Deus Ex, two of my all time favorite series.

Damn...I could not agree more about Thief and Deus Ex being some of the best gaming series of all time.

Now I'm afraid I'll have to check out this game, and give up what little free time I have...
Jelle Klap
Bartender

Joined: Mar 10, 2008
Posts: 1768
    
    7

Yeah, but it doesn't impart the same sense of scale or depth, though. Compared to Thief: TDP, Thief 2: The Metal Age and the first Deus Ex the levels are far smaller and the game world and story are less engaging. Especially compared to DE. I still liked it though, lots of fun sneaking around steampunk, plague-ridden city and executing silent non-leathal take downs.

/derail
dennis deems
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 12, 2011
Posts: 808
Oh, gonna have to give this a try as well! Love me some stealth. Never managed to wrangle a copy of Deus Ex but I like the Thief games and I adore the Splinter Cell series.

Oh and while I have hundreds of books, only about a couple dozen are about computing. It ought to be fewer than that by rights, but I have a hard time parting with books, even books I never finished. There are only about ten tech books I would never want to be without.
Samuel Bird
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 19, 2013
Posts: 96

Umm... I have four. I tend to use ebooks and pdfs (;) because I cannot afford to buy a ton of books. I do have 17 books on mathematics, proper textbooks, though which isn't bad considering I am 15.
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30752
    
156

Samuel Bird wrote:Umm... I have four. I tend to use ebooks and pdfs (;) because I cannot afford to buy a ton of books. I do have 17 books on mathematics, proper textbooks, though which isn't bad considering I am 15.

e-books are still books. And I think you'll accumulate more over time!
Pradeep bhatt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

May be 70. I sold many as I am shifting my home. Most books have got outdated and sadly have not been read at all.


Groovy
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61413
    
  67

Oh, yes. That happens a lot. I'll buy a book on a topic I'm interested in, or know that I need to learn, but by the time I get to it, it's already obsolete.
Dieter Quickfend
Bartender

Joined: Aug 06, 2010
Posts: 543
    
    4

my book case (complete with ladder ;)) is filled with tech books, fantasy books and classic literature. I'd say it's about one third each. I mostly read eBooks though, on my Nexus 7. I haven't been in the industry that long either. I've filled all space on google docs and then my company's upload space, dropbox and Ubuntu One with eBooks, now I have this server I use for the remainder but I plan to get a NAS sometime. Most of the books I got for really cheap or free, there's a large book fair in the Netherlands which used to have quite a few good cheap tech books, though the past few years it's been a poor harvest. A lot of books I got sent for free because I asked for them from the writer when they were offering, or at Devoxx. At present, I don't really have the money to buy more, except if I find them for cheap. Would be nice to have a good subscription eBook website with a lot of specialized tech books. I would sign up for something like that.

I used to teach Java and had the right to order any book I wanted at my employer's expense. And keep it. That was great, that's how I got most of them. my current employer has most of those books and you can borrow them, so they don't end up in my house.

I've also got quite a few hard copies of specs printed out and lying around in my house. I know, wasted trees, but they were a giant help before I had my Nexus 7 (I spend 3 hours per day on the train)


Oracle Certified Professional: Java SE 6 Programmer && Oracle Certified Expert: (JEE 6 Web Component Developer && JEE 6 EJB Developer)
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1771
    
  14

Dieter Quickfend wrote:Would be nice to have a good subscription eBook website with a lot of specialized tech books. I would sign up for something like that.

Would Safari be useful?
Dieter Quickfend
Bartender

Joined: Aug 06, 2010
Posts: 543
    
    4

chris webster wrote:
Dieter Quickfend wrote:Would be nice to have a good subscription eBook website with a lot of specialized tech books. I would sign up for something like that.

Would Safari be useful?

That looks very interesting! I'll check that out, thanks a lot!
Bert Bates
author
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 14, 2002
Posts: 8829
    
    5
Depends on how you define a "tech book" - just computers or any non-fiction? If you count topics like photography, psychology, cognitive sciences and so on, we probably *currently* have well over a thousand books. If you mean only computer books, we probably have 400. (I know this because we're currently doing our "once every several years purging" and so far we've collected over 200 books that we're going to give away.


Spot false dilemmas now, ask me how!
(If you're not on the edge, you're taking up too much room.)
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: How many tech books you have?