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I am software engineer and get a option to get Permanent residence in Australia and Canada

 
jacob deiter
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I am software engineer and get a option to get Permanent residence in Australia and Canada,which country is best for my carrier growth
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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If you are going to work in an English speaking country, it is time to learn how to spell "career".

You could look at job posting to see which country has more openings and which are more interesting to you. But I think it is more important which of the two countries you would rather live in.
 
chris webster
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You're a very lucky person - I could no longer qualify for the Canadian PR permit after they changed the rules a few years back (should have applied sooner, doh!).

My own impression is that the immigration authorities are serious about the "permanent" resident label i.e. these visas are aimed at people who want to settle permanently in Canada/Australia. Assuming this is your plan, then Jeanne's right: look at the job market to get an idea of whether you can find the kind of work you want, but it's even more important to think about where you (and your family) want to live in the long term. Both countries have cities that regularly appear at the top of "quality of life" surveys (Sydney, Melbourne, Vancouver, Montreal), both have high standards for things like education, healthcare, welfare provision etc. Of course, the climates and locations are very different, which may be a factor for you.

But if you have applied for PR status in these countries, surely you've thought/done some research about what it would be like to live there? If not, maybe you shouldn't be moving there at all.
 
Jan de Boer
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:If you are going to work in an English speaking country, it is time to learn how to spell "career".


Okay but do you know that English has the most inconsistent spelling of all European languages? It's a pity that exactly this language has developed to the world's lingua franca. I would have preferred German, Spanish, Italian or even Dutch. (But that is all off topic.)
 
Henry Wong
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Jan de Boer wrote:
Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:If you are going to work in an English speaking country, it is time to learn how to spell "career".


Okay but do you know that English has the most inconsistent spelling of all European languages? It's a pity that exactly this language has developed to the world's lingua franca. I would have preferred German, Spanish, Italian or even Dutch. (But that is all off topic.)



Agreed. English is horrible in this regard... which is why I tend to shy away from being the grammar police. However, Jeanne is correct here. To a native english speaker, those words are not even close. Besides the obvious that they have different meanings, they also don't sound alike. To make it worse, they don't even have the same number of syllables. It will come off as awkward (and untrained), which is not something that you want when trying to get a job.

Henry


PS.... why is French not on your list?? ...
 
chris webster
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Henry Wong wrote:PS.... why is French not on your list?? ...

I'm no expert in French, but from my limited experience of French, half of each written word is not pronounced, and most of the rest is spoken through the nose. French needs its own spelling reform to get rid of all the stuff that nobody pronounces anyway.

But the "carrier"/"career" distinction is about stress, as well as the vowel sounds: CARRier, but carEER. English-learners often have trouble with English stress/intonation, because it's not as regular as e.g. Italian or Spanish. And who knows what's going on with "aLOOminum" vs. "aluMINium"...

Uh oh, drifting off topic. But good spoken/written English is surely a requirement for making a success of emigrating to any English-speaking country, especially if you want a professional career such as software engineer.
 
Joe Harry
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chris webster wrote:
Henry Wong wrote:PS.... why is French not on your list?? ...

I'm no expert in French, but from my limited experience of French, half of each written word is not pronounced, and most of the rest is spoken through the nose. French needs its own spelling reform to get rid of all the stuff that nobody pronounces anyway.


The German language is a lot better in that sense. Something like a WYSWYS.... What You See is What You Spell! of course with the German intonation and accent.
 
Kathleen Angeles
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before anything, what factors are important for you to be happy? (given/assuming that both are the same in job market)

weather? proximity to your mother country? proximity to usa which has a lot to offer in future? etc.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Everybody: this isn't MD, let's keep it on-topic.

What kind of professional growth you can expect would depend largely on the job an dthe company in question (about which we know nothing). Why do you think it's mostly about the country?
 
jacob deiter
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:If you are going to work in an English speaking country, it is time to learn how to spell "career".

You could look at job posting to see which country has more openings and which are more interesting to you. But I think it is more important which of the two countries you would rather live in.


Sorry, I have spelled wrongly .
But please suggest how I can find the job opening in both countries, because I do not have more friends or relatives there to get more information about it, so please suggest is there any way to get those details?
 
Junilu Lacar
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jacob deiter wrote:so please suggest is there any way to get those details?


Google for "jobs in canada" and "jobs in australia" for starters
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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jacob deiter wrote:But please suggest how I can find the job opening in both countries, because I do not have more friends or relatives there to get more information about it, so please suggest is there any way to get those details?

Job boards and talking to recruiters. Or looking at company listings. I would imagine. I live in the US and haven't looked for a job in either country.

I wasn't trying to be the grammar police. I was trying to be helpful. If I got a cover letter that use the "word" carrier, I'd toss it. Better to learn that lesson here where it is harmless than with an actual company.
 
Julio Cesar Marques
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Grammar Nazis are a real thing just like that?

I had a Job opportunity in Canada in the past and i declined because of fear of change. I'm not a English native speaker (far from that), if i had the same contact today i probably would decline to be afraid of misuse some word and be crucified for this. My opinion is that the prior objective of any language is to communicate and i think the fella up here achieved that goal. Funniest thing is English speakers usually speaks only English (that you are suppose to) and have the guts to point finger to people that can speak 3, 4, 5 languages.

C'mon


PS I agreed that if you are aiming a hi job position you are expected to have compatible language skills with it. But here is not a job interview.
 
Jayesh A Lalwani
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Julio,

Appreciate the input. However, since the thread has been dead for 2+ years, it's highly unlikely that any ranchers who participated in this thread would have an opinion either way.

Besides, this is not MD, and we try to keep discussions on job related discussions here
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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