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why most of the programmer want to become manager ?

Seetharaman Venkatasamy
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Joined: Jan 28, 2008
Posts: 5575

tell me, are you a programmer?
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
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Joined: Oct 02, 2003
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  16

What makes you think that most programmers want to become managers?


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Seetharaman Venkatasamy
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Joined: Jan 28, 2008
Posts: 5575

*IMO*
fred rosenberger wrote:What makes you think that most programmers want to become managers?

good question . the answer is theoretical is different, real time work is different ---if somebody has that opinion he is eligible for a manager.
it is hard to analysis a technical person ...
Ulf Dittmer
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Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 41148
    
  45
Instead of hoping the chicken will cross the road you could then just tell it to do so.


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Jayesh A Lalwani
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Joined: Jan 17, 2008
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  28

A lot of programmers want to become managers because they have been told that. Especially in countries that a lot of IT jobs are being outsourced to. The companies that are getting the outsourced jobs tend to build their culture on what they consider to be American style of management: if you think a worker is good, put 3 people under him; if he can manage them, keep adding people till he needs managers under him. The funny thing is that these companies are learning their management strategies from companies that embody the Peter Principle.


Highly successful IT companies in the US, OTH, provide avenues for growth for their technical people while keeping them technical. And that's what makes them successful. Plus, in the US you have a lot more avenues. You can be a consultant and stay technical throughout your life and get paid really well. You have many more opportunities to work at startups here. You join a startup that starts with a core group of people. If it is successful, you make oodles of money and you become an investor yourself. If its not successful, you still earn a healthy amount of money, get a lot of experience and jump to the next thing.
Andrew Monkhouse
author and jackaroo
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Joined: Mar 28, 2003
Posts: 11404
    
  81

fred rosenberger wrote:What makes you think that most programmers want to become managers?


Hmm, sounds like Fred is channeling Eliza.


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Pat Farrell
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Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4646
    
    5

I reject the premise of this question. First, you would have to ask "do most programmers want to become a manager?"

While there are good and valid reasons to want to be a manager (i.e. more money, bigger office) there are lots of reasons to not want this "promotion." A manager's job is nothing like a developing engineer's job. There is lots more bureaucracy and political BS.

Once you become a manager, then the obvious question becomes "why to managers want to become senior managers?"
And while the more money and bigger office is true as you go up the ladder, the headaches, bureaucracy and BS gets much larger too.

Back in the 1970s, there was a famous book: The Peter Principal http://www.amazon.com/Peter-Principle-Things-Always-Wrong/dp/B002QGSWGA
It holds that good people are promoted until they become incompetent. If you are a good engineer, they promote you to being a team lead. If you are a good team lead, they promote you to project manager. As long as you are great at your job, you get promoted. But if you are a terrible team lead, you will never be promoted to the next step. In this case, "team lead" is your personal level of incompetence.

Every person has their own personal level.

I was a good manager of about ten engineers. There is no way, zero chance, that I could be a good manager of 50 engineers. And while I was a good manager, I'm reallly, really a lot better at design and development.
Paul Clapham
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Joined: Oct 14, 2005
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    8

This is anecdote and not data: I never wanted to become a manager. And my superiors agreed with me (or so I assume, we didn't actually discuss the matter) and didn't want me to be a manager either. I had good reasons and so did they. Anyway the end result was that I am not now and never have been a manager.
Andy Jack
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Joined: Nov 22, 2012
Posts: 257
Seetharaman Venkatasamy wrote:tell me, are you a programmer?


A more serious treatment of the topic, in case you are in the mood.
http://www.coderanch.com/t/599172/Jobs/careers/tech-guys-developers-managers#2733762


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chris webster
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Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1621
    
  13

Pat Farrell wrote:Back in the 1970s, there was a famous book: The Peter Principal http://www.amazon.com/Peter-Principle-Things-Always-Wrong/dp/B002QGSWGA
It holds that good people are promoted until they become incompetent. If you are a good engineer, they promote you to being a team lead. If you are a good team lead, they promote you to project manager. As long as you are great at your job, you get promoted. But if you are a terrible team lead, you will never be promoted to the next step. In this case, "team lead" is your personal level of incompetence.

Every person has their own personal level.

All true. But back in the 1990s there was a not-entirely-serious book: The Dilbert Principle
It holds that some people are promoted because they are incompetent, in order to get them out of the way, or as one Dilbert cartoon put it: "leadership is nature's way of removing morons from the productive flow".

Not suggesting for a moment that all managers fit this pattern (least of all you, Pat), but I've seen enough cases where this seems like the only plausible explanation for those individuals' exalted status. Of course, if you only see the end-state i.e. somebody who's incompetent, you can't always tell if they were promoted because or until they were incompetent...

As for me, like Paul C. I have no desire to be a manager, and indeed I'm sure I'd be a bad one if I tried.


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