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Starting Java

R. Joshi
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 04, 2013
Posts: 22

Hi, i want to start learning Java , but have only one month as i have job interview in Oracle & IBM. I have no experience in programming , but willing to do whatever it takes to get into Oracle or IBM. I am thinking of reading either from "Thinking in Java" or "Core Java", or Head First Java is enough to get into them . Please help me please please please reply soon.
Kemal Sokolovic
Bartender

Joined: Jun 19, 2010
Posts: 825
    
    5

One month wouldn't be enough to make your wish come true, even for someone who already does have experience with software development. Especially if we are talking about the same Oracle and IBM that I know about.

Search the forum for similar topics, since these have already been discussed several times, so you can get a better feeling of what other people think about it.

Welcome to the Ranch!


The quieter you are, the more you are able to hear.
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender

Joined: Mar 17, 2011
Posts: 8250
    
  23

R. Joshi wrote:...Please help me please please please reply soon.

First: welcome to JavaRanch.

Second: EaseUp (←click). We're all volunteers here.

Third: I think Kemal's covered most of it, but I'd just add that you should probably read this page. Not to put you off, but programming is a career, not a job opportunity; and you should make sure that you
(a) LIKE it.
(b) Are suited to it (not everyone is).
The page will also give you some idea of what you can expect to manage in a month. I doubt that you would be asking this question if it was a forum about medicine.

Winston


Isn't it funny how there's always time and money enough to do it WRONG?
Articles by Winston can be found here
R. Joshi
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 04, 2013
Posts: 22

Winston Gutkowski wrote:
First: welcome to JavaRanch.

Second: EaseUp (←click). We're all volunteers here.

Third: I think Kemal's covered most of it, but I'd just add that you should probably read this page. Not to put you off, but programming is a career, not a job opportunity; and you should make sure that you
(a) LIKE it.
(b) Are suited to it (not everyone is).

Winston


Thanks both of you for this warm welcome & prompt reply also for the help on EaspUp . I totally agree with both of you that it's not a 1 month game. So, can you help me with books as I said I am confused between "Core Java", "Thinking In Java" & "Head First Java" after reading their reivews . Also I consulted my seniors they said "Head First" does not provide an indepth knowledge is it??? as for those companies one needs indepth knowledge of the language (this I think) .

Also is knowledge of C required for Java???

So that if not this time may be after some time i might get into Oracle / IBM.
R. Joshi
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 04, 2013
Posts: 22

Also, I want to make a career in programming . Sorry for second post i forgot to mention in previous post.
Rameshwar Soni
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 03, 2011
Posts: 247
R. Joshi wrote:I am confused between "Core Java", "Thinking In Java" & "Head First Java" after reading their reivews .


All these books are good and according to me you can refer anyone or even all but one at a time.

Also I consulted my seniors they said "Head First" does not provide an indepth knowledge is it??? as for those companies one needs indepth knowledge of the language (this I think) .


I think its impossible for a single book to cover all aspects of Java programming. Now what is your definition of in-depth ?

Also is knowledge of C required for Java???


No C is not required for Java, but if we know one language then it definitely helps us in learning the second language a bit faster.

Here are some links which might help you.

1) this

2) this
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39885
    
  28
Rameshwar Soni wrote: . . . No C is not required for Java, but if we know one language then it definitely helps us in learning the second language a bit faster. . . .
A lot of people who come here having learned procedural programming in C find it very difficult to move to object‑programming. The syntax is easy to learn, but not the paradigm.
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11480
    
  16

R. Joshi wrote:Hi, i want to start learning Java , but have only one month as i have job interview in Oracle & IBM. I have no experience in programming , but willing to do whatever it takes to get into Oracle or IBM. I am thinking of reading either from "Thinking in Java" or "Core Java", or Head First Java is enough to get into them . Please help me please please please reply soon.

What kind of position are you interviewing for? If you are going for a programming position, then either a) you don't need to know anything, as they don't expect you to, or b) you blatantly misrepresented yourself on your resume, and now you're trying to cover it up during the interview. There may be a 'c' option, but i'm not sure what that would be.

One month is not enough time to become a good programmer. If you are interviewing for anything beyond a junior level position as a programmer, you are most likely in for a big surprise.


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
R. Joshi
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 04, 2013
Posts: 22

Rameshwar Soni wrote: Now what is your definition of in-depth ?


In-Depth in the sense it covers all the classes, methods & all the other concepts required to make any kind of aplication, for example "Java docs by Oracle" has all the information about the language & I tried them but found the language a bit difficult to understand may be because I have always read books with lots of theory.

So that kind of book which all the information of the "Java Docs" in addition to theoretical explanation of the concepts.
R. Joshi
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 04, 2013
Posts: 22

fred rosenberger wrote:
What kind of position are you interviewing for?


I am going for an entry level Application Programmer post, I am a recent graduate. I mentioned it in my resume and now when I got a call I am trying to back it up. But anyways thanks for the help, & I will do my best to gain competency in Java so that next time I make into those companies. One more thing do I need to know XML also for Java because many online Java tutorials have XML also in their course content for Java. And can Java be learned without any coaching class for it???
Rajdeep Biswas
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 26, 2012
Posts: 186

This 1 month period might be a blatant excuse. We wish you the best, but tis one month can get you off to a kick start in programming if you are serious.

Do not: And you can tell the interviewer: "See, a month's programming dose and I am here facing you. What will happen if I study for a year! A power hydron collider!! :P"


The biggest gamble will be to ask a question whose answer you know in that it will challenge your theory | www.TechAspire.blogspot.in
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender

Joined: Mar 17, 2011
Posts: 8250
    
  23

R. Joshi wrote:In-Depth in the sense it covers all the classes, methods & all the other concepts required to make any kind of aplication...

Well good luck with that, because even if you do manage to find one, it's likely to take a year to read and digest all 17 volumes.

for example "Java docs by Oracle" has all the information about the language...

It does? Sounds like a book about javadoc to me.

If it's theory you want, then you should get a decent book about OO (Object Orientation), because that's one of the basic foundation stones of Java. The one I read was this one, but that was back in the early nineties. Another possibility is this one, which I haven't read, but have heard about; and the author is well known in the field.

Other than that, what you really need is practise, practise, practise; and for that, a book like Head First should be just fine.

Winston
 
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