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"Move into management (if that's what you want)"

Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 32481
    
214

Move into management (if that's what you want)

I liked seeing this quote in the book summary on Amazon. I like that it is no longer a given that one has to move into management to be successful.

If you could give two pieces of advice to tech folks about not becoming a manager, what would they be?


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Greg Charles
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 01, 2001
Posts: 2927
    
  12

Following the pattern you've suggested:

1. Managers spend most of their time in boring meetings (but there are sometimes free doughnuts)
2. Managers don't actually produce anything (but they can take credit for what others produce)
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 32481
    
214

Greg Charles wrote:Following the pattern you've suggested:

1. Managers spend most of their time in boring meetings (but there are sometimes free doughnuts)
2. Managers don't actually produce anything (but they can take credit for what others produce)

Sorry, I should have been clearer. I meant career advice for folks who don't want to be managers. Like "keep learning technology." Or "it is important to understand manager's concerns even if you don't want to be one"
Henry Wong
author
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Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 20026
    
  44

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:
Sorry, I should have been clearer. I meant career advice for folks who don't want to be managers. Like "keep learning technology." Or "it is important to understand manager's concerns even if you don't want to be one"


I too, don't want to be a manager -- but I came to the decision by trying it out... I actually wasn't bad, in fact, it was enjoyable to be able to solve "bigger" (or maybe "higher level" is a better phrase) problems. I was decent, but I enjoyed being a individual contributor more. I was also better being hands-on with technology, and could almost feel the "peter principle" creeping up on me.

Regardless, I am glad I tried it, even if it was only for a very short period.

Henry

Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 63196
    
  69

I've been management a number of times, and each time I say "never again". But I never learn; I'll likely try it again if the right opportunity presents itself.


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Greg Charles
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 01, 2001
Posts: 2927
    
  12

Ah, you don't want advice against becoming a manager, but what you can do to keep up a life-long career in development. Let me change my answer then. Keep learning new technology is a given, so I'll go with:

-- Learn how to present your ideas. Developers often hate standing in front a group and speaking. It's a vital skill to have though.
-- Own the success of your project. As you build up experience, you should not only be implementing requirements, but partly driving them too, or at least identifying gaps in them.
 
Have you checked out Aspose?
 
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