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To Matthew Moran: So many skills needed so little time - what do?

 
Ted North
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Hi Matthew,

As a currently unemployed java programmer and holder of a Bachelor of Science in IT/Software Engineering I see dozens and dozens of possible job boards to submit my resume too. Each with their own huge list of terms of use and privacy policies to read and which often link to a companies website that also has its own terms of use and privacy policy to read and conform to at the threat of legal sanctions. Anyway, each posting on these job web-sites has a myriad of skills listed; so many skills that it almost seems like it is impossible for anyone to be an expert in all of them.

My question is how does one become an expert at all the required skills? Skills such as years of experience with Java SE and especially for the business world, Java EE are often seen on job boards. This skills are a requirement in addition to being an 'expert' at HTML5/CSS3/JavaScript, a scripting language like Python, Perl, or Ruby, another language like C/C++, and knows something about mobile development in Android (Android SDK - that uses Java) or iOS (Objective-C)? Oh yeah and they also need to know about relational databases and SQL... Also employers often want people with 'people skills' as if getting along with people is some type of strange science.

Does your book answer these seemingly unanswerable questions? What about those questions on job boards or asked by recruiters where they ask you to rate yourself from 1 to 10 on your skills?

Well I hope I win the book. Thanks for reading this and writing a book. I wish it were only 100 pages though... as I have a privacy policy I need to read I am sure.

Regards,

TN(t)

 
Matthew Moran
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My book does answer the question.. in that it explains that job boards are NOT your best source of opportunities.

Also, the unrealistic skillsets are there to reduce resumes.. most, if not all, of the people submitting don't really have a ton of skill in all areas.

Networking is the key - or at least a key. The second is to approach more approachable businesses.. Short term at least. Mid- and small companies do not have the same barriers to entry.

Finally, work with a recruiter/headhunter. In many cases, they have direct relationships with employers.. They can open doors to larger organizations more easily. And that is another key - finding companies that have contracts with those employees.
 
Ted North
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My book does answer the question.. in that it explains that job boards are NOT your best source of opportunities.

Also, the unrealistic skillsets are there to reduce resumes.. most, if not all, of the people submitting don't really have a ton of skill in all areas.

Networking is the key - or at least a key. The second is to approach more approachable businesses.. Short term at least. Mid- and small companies do not have the same barriers to entry.

Finally, work with a recruiter/headhunter. In many cases, they have direct relationships with employers.. They can open doors to larger organizations more easily. And that is another key - finding companies that have contracts with those employees.


Thank-you for the reply! So approaching small companies for open positions directly is better in the short term?

Also, all the headhunters I have worked with just seem to call me about some open position then stop calling when I do not obtain the position or after the first call. :/

Thank-you again sir for the reply.

Respectfully,

Ted
 
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