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Is Wicket for real big websites

 
Tomasz Prus
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I know that Wicket is really good web application framework. I'm very satisfied with Wicket small reusable component oriented concept and a lot of things that are simplified by Wicket. I fall in love with Wicket but..

..i have a trepidation: "Is Wicket good choice for developing Websites?".

Almost everything in Wicket is serialized and statefull pages are native for Wicket. How does Wicket deal with website problems? Is it trivial or does it require hacking framework and raping community
I know that Wicket have some solutions for stateless pages, for example, but my question is: "Is Wicket really good framework for websites too and should it be the first choice for this target?"
 
Eelco Hillenius
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Originally posted by Tomasz Prus:
I know that Wicket is really good web application framework. I'm very satisfied with Wicket small reusable component oriented concept and a lot of things that are simplified by Wicket. I fall in love with Wicket but..

..i have a trepidation: "Is Wicket good choice for developing Websites?".

Almost everything in Wicket is serialized and statefull pages are native for Wicket. How does Wicket deal with website problems? Is it trivial or does it require hacking framework and raping community
I know that Wicket have some solutions for stateless pages, for example, but my question is: "Is Wicket really good framework for websites too and should it be the first choice for this target?"


That depends... If you're coding a public web site with a fairly straightforward UI (say an Amazon, where most of the interesting work arguably happens in the back end), using Wicket might add little value over - say - using regular JSPs. I'd still prefer to work with stateless pages in that case, but of course I already know Wicket well.

Wicket depends on server side memory and serialization (though highly optimized) to provide a stateful programming model. That doesn't come entirely free, and one of the tradeoffs is that scaling it may need some work. Now, supporting thousands of users on one box shouldn't be a problem (and I know this from both testing and from experience). Beyond that, as long as you use sticky sessions without facilities for failover, you can just add machines, no problem. It only gets relatively expensive (compared to stateless programming) when you need to support failover or non-sticky session schemes. In that case, do your math and prepare resources. My experience is that it's not as expensive as you might expect, especially if you use something like the cluster project in wicket-stuff, or use something like Terracotta.
 
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