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How long does it take to get a job in the Netherlands?

Jan de Boer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 10, 2010
Posts: 490
    
    1
How long does it take to get a job in the Netherlands? I am about 50, I have a good CV, and I am a native Dutch speaker.

I am utterly confused. I have heard from the management that our whole development department will be outsourced and ceases to exist. But, they have not told me when.

A few weeks ago they told us they were talking to an outsourcing company but this would not affect our jobs. Then they told us they are going to outsource our development, but the outsourcing company will make us an offer to join them, now they tell us they are still negotiating on this. Also I have asked: How long I should stay here, when will this go into effect? One time they say as soon as we have an agreement with the outsourcing company, then they say I should stay here at least a few months more, since my project is not finished yet. So, I do not know what to do...

One thing that could help is to know, how much time there now is, very approximately, between starting to look for a job and getting it. I have read the job market is at its very worst since years. On the other hand, experienced Java and .NET developers are still very much in demand. And the average time to get a new job would be like a month. If so then I can wait a while before I start looking. Or I can join that outsourcing company, but I do not know if I want to do that, or if their offer will be good or bad.

And sometimes I think the management is just unreliable and that they are holding me on a string...

What should I do??
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1871
    
  16

If I were you, I'd start looking for a new job now so you can take your time and hopefully find the right one for you. I don't know how it works in the Netherlands, but here's how outsourcing often works here in the UK.

Step 1: Company A announces decision to outsource their IT to company B, but assures staff that their jobs will be transferred under protected employment (TUPE) to company B.

Step 2: Staff from company A are TUPEd to company B, and their jobs/pay/conditions are guaranteed for a limited period e.g 12 months.

Step 3: Company B starts bringing in offshore staff to shadow the ex-A staff, who are expected to help train the offshore resources.

Step 4: The offshore staff are rotated back home before they or company B might have to start paying UK taxes. Back home they form the nucleus of the offshore development/support team for company A's IT.

Step 5: After 12 months, most of the work for company A is moved to the offshore team. The former staff from company A are fired as soon as their TUPE protection expires.

Of course, some transfers to outsourcing providers may not go down this route. But you probably need to ask yourself what benefits your company expects to gain from outsourcing your job. If it's mainly to cut costs, ask yourself how they will get your work done more cheaply, without some impact on you.

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Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61761
    
  67

chris webster wrote:If I were you, I'd start looking for a new job now

Quoted for truth. Now. As in now.

Management is not looking out for you. Management is not your buddy. Management will do or say anything to get what's best for them, even if means throwing you under the bus.

It seems counter-intuitive, but it's much easier to get a new job when you already have one. Look now; don't wait for the axe to fall.


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Jan de Boer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 10, 2010
Posts: 490
    
    1
Bear Bibeault wrote:It seems counter-intuitive, but it's much easier to get a new job when you already have one. Look now; don't wait for the axe to fall.


But I have certain rights here in the Netherlands, they cannot just fire me. Either they should give me a contract with the outsourcer, or they should give about 1 month worth of salary for each year I have worked for them. In my case it's about 10,000 euro (yeah before tax..) if they want to pay me off. If I leave myself now, I make life easier for the people who want to dump me. And then maybe the next company will give me a year contract and after one year they would let me go again.

It's more complicated..
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1871
    
  16

I guess it depends on how important it is for you to get the pay-off, but my own experience is that Bear's right: it's much harder to get a job if you're out of work, and it's also hard if the clock is ticking and you know you are going to be out of work in e.g. 3 months' time. Once you are made redundant, your pay-off will be disappearing while you look for work. Here in the UK, we have limited rights to redundancy pay, but you still need to find a new job pretty quickly (unless you're an ex-banker with a fat pay-off and a huge pension, of course!).

If I were you, I'd start looking now. If you get a chance to receive a pay-off, great, and if they transfer you to an OK job with the outsourcing company, that's great too. But surely you want to be able to choose your next job for yourself, rather than have to accept what you're offered because you can't afford to spend too long looking for something better? And your bosses will fire you if they want to, one way or another, either by firing you straight or by outsourcing you to another company who will fire you later on. I reckon it's better to jump in your own time than be pushed. Your choice, though.
Jan de Boer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 10, 2010
Posts: 490
    
    1
Well the pay-off bonus is important. But, it's also psychological. If I leave, voluntarily, I do the people that want to get rid of me a favour.. On the other hand, maybe I should not let such an emotional thing influence my decision and just do what is sensible. I have to sleep on this a little..

Anyway, I have an interview Tuesday even, since in the social network, somebody already suggested a position for me.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61761
    
  67

Jan de Boer wrote:If I leave, voluntarily, I do the people that want to get rid of me a favour..
Worst. Reasoning. Ever.
Jelle Klap
Bartender

Joined: Mar 10, 2008
Posts: 1836
    
    7

Right now, Java developers are in demand in the Netherlands. Most companies that are actively recruiting even offer some kind of bonus arrangement (monetary incentives, tablets etc.) to stimulate their employees to look for good people within their own networks. If I were in your position, honestly, I'd feel the same way. I would definetely be on the lookout for new employment now, but the pay-off bonus is just too good to pass up if they're going to be ditching you anyway.

Bear Bibeault wrote:Worst. Reasoning. Ever.

Yeah, reason doesn't really apply here, but I'm sure I'd feel the same way.


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