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Updating current resume?

Amandeep Singh
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Joined: Jul 17, 2008
Posts: 845
Hello,

Currently I'm working on a well-rounded position which involves not only working on Java/JEE projects. Also supporting many vendor products for our company users. I worked on multiple many small-2 projects (more than 10 projects) in years. When it comes to updating resume, it seems to be impractical to add 10 projects under 1 company in my resume.

Yes, i can add at least 2 projects in resume which i know better than other projects.

I'm posting here if someone had similar experience how they updated their resume.

Thanks....


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Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
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Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 31079
    
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Summarize. A resume is not an itemized list of everything you've ever done. Also, most employers care about what you did and not about the projects. A couple lines summarizing a couple of projects is more than sufficient. I have literally three lines about projects on my resume - and that's over a decade.

Focus on summarizing what you did. What technologies did you work with? What did you do on those projects?

Try to think about the resume from the point of view of the reader. What do you want them to see in 10 seconds? one minute? Three minutes?


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Bear Bibeault
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I could not agree more with Jeanne. The individual projects are not important; it's what you learned form them and how you contributed that matters.

I've seen a lot of resumes that are a laundry list of projects people worked on, with no explanation of what they did or how they contributed. I get tired after about item #2.


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Amandeep Singh
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Joined: Jul 17, 2008
Posts: 845
Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Summarize. A resume is not an itemized list of everything you've ever done. Also, most employers care about what you did and not about the projects. A couple lines summarizing a couple of projects is more than sufficient. I have literally three lines about projects on my resume - and that's over a decade.

Focus on summarizing what you did. What technologies did you work with? What did you do on those projects?

Try to think about the resume from the point of view of the reader. What do you want them to see in 10 seconds? one minute? Three minutes?


Excellent explanation here. The most common practice i have seen in resumes is- the project name, company name, years are listed and explanation,all the bullet points (what was done) are listed for that project.
Example-

Project A- Company X [2005-Present]

Project Explanation Summary

Summary of bullet points (what i did)

Environment


In my case I don't have the same situation. If i understood you correctly, it would look like this, let me know if requires corrections. But this means i'm not mentioning project names. AS you said employers don't care about project names/project explanations.

Company X [2005-Present]

Summary of bullet points (what i did)

Environment

I see here myself at the disadvantage of not mentioning project names and explanations. My shortlisted top 2 projects out of many i've worked on.

My understanding is employers do really care how well you understand your current project, what's business behind this. Work done on it of-course.
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
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Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 31079
    
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Amandeep Singh wrote:My understanding is employers do really care how well you understand your current project, what's business behind this. Work done on it of-course.

At the interview, I care that a candidate can talk about his/her project. On the interview, I don't feel the need to read about it. Your new format is fine.
Amandeep Singh
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Joined: Jul 17, 2008
Posts: 845
Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:
Amandeep Singh wrote:My understanding is employers do really care how well you understand your current project, what's business behind this. Work done on it of-course.

At the interview, I care that a candidate can talk about his/her project. On the interview, I don't feel the need to read about it. Your new format is fine.


Isn't it weird if candidate is talking about his/her project. But the project name is not listed in the current company? Mostly in the interview it is asked- tell me about Project A.
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
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First of all, I didn't say you can't mention any projects. I said not to take up a lot of space with them. Again, I have three lines (one for each of three projects I want to mention) on my resume. That doesn't mean I only worked on three projects.

And no, I don't think it is weird. I regularly ask candidates "tell me what you did at company X", or "tell me about your latest project". If there is a whole story about the project written down, odds are good I haven't read it or have forgotten it.

I like using Bear's resume as a good example. He mentions the project name in passing. And he only describes it from the point of relevant technical detail.
Amandeep Singh
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Joined: Jul 17, 2008
Posts: 845
thanks alot. this helps.
arulk pillai
Author
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Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3275
Itemizing tasks makes your resume boring to read.

-- Look at the job requirements and target your resume.
-- Extract your accomplishments and strengths from the 10 projects you had worked on.
-- Put yourself on prospective employer's shoes.

If not sure, refer to the sample resumes I have put together on my blog.


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Amandeep Singh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 17, 2008
Posts: 845
arulk pillai wrote:Itemizing tasks makes your resume boring to read.

-- Look at the job requirements and target your resume.
-- Extract your accomplishments and strengths from the 10 projects you had worked on.
-- Put yourself on prospective employer's shoes.

If not sure, refer to the sample resumes I have put together on my blog.


very nice. this really helps alot.
Bill Clar
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Joined: Sep 21, 2006
Posts: 153

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:I like using Bear's resume as a good example. He mentions the project name in passing. And he only describes it from the point of relevant technical detail.


Bear's resume is invaluable. Thank you!


I'm revamping my resume and I do have a question. I worked on a Visual C++ project way back in 1999 and I don't remember a thing about Visual C++. Should I omit it from my Skills section?

Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
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Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 31079
    
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Bill,
If it's on your resume, it is fair game to ask about. At least if it is in a keywords section or a recent job. If the only mention is in 1999, nobody will expect you to remember it. If the job doesn't require Visual C++, I'd leave it out. If it is a nice to have, it might indicate you could learn it faster than someone who never used it. I don't know. I lean towards leave it out.
 
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