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Using Netbeans IDE or notepad+ for practice

Ola Olusegun
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 13, 2013
Posts: 15
Hello,
what is the benefit of using a text editor over a shortcut IDE to practice java programming. Or does it really matter if i use any?
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender

Joined: Mar 17, 2011
Posts: 8008
    
  22

Ola Olusegun wrote:what is the benefit of using a text editor over a shortcut IDE to practice java programming. Or does it really matter if i use any?

For anyone that wants to answer this question - and please do so; it's an important one - I think it was prompted by my my reply in this thread. And please feel free to disagree.

@Ola: Hope you don't mind that I put in the link. If you don't mind, I won't answer this question until you've had a few other opinions. You don't just want to hear mine.

Winston

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Riley Redd
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 28, 2013
Posts: 9
Winston Gutkowski wrote:
Well there's your first mistake, in my view. At this stage, I'd strongly advise you to use a decent text editor - Notepad+ works for me - and learn to compile and jar from the command line. However, that's by-the-by.


I assume you are correct, but for me, I have been spending all my free time in the past 2 weeks trying to learn the basics of Java (i am absolutely blasting through this book, trying to get as much done [and I do every single problem I come accross in the book] as I can before college starts, because I know i will have to slow down once it starts [I am taking a Intro to Java class this semester {I really am trying to learn I promise!} and so it shouldn't be to hard to stay on track and get the book done by October or November {I'm at about 139 of 1138 pages in}])

I sorta got side-tracked on that monolougue there, but the point is, I have been using Eclipse and while its probably not the best for a beginner, it allows me to progress so much quicker through all the problems I come across. (otherwise I'd probably still be on chapter 2 ^.^')
Peter Johnson
author
Bartender

Joined: May 14, 2008
Posts: 5836
    
    7

I learned Java using a simple text editor (UltraEdit, my company sprang for licenses), did all builds and compiles via the command line (even used nmake to do the compiles, that was the days before Ant, but switched to Ant after hearing about it at JavaOne), and had the javadocs open in my browser. Doing this forced me to understand a lot of things that the IDE will hide from you: package names, classpaths, JAR/WAR file contents, etc. That understanding has helped me well.

And even now I use Eclipse only as a glorified text editor - I rely heavily on its command completion, javadoc display when I hover, automatic formatting, warning flags (nothing gets checked in to source control until the warning flags are all gone), source control integration. But for building and running, I'm strictly command line, though now I use Maven for building and running tests, and generate scripts (.bat and .sh files) to run the app.


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Shivom Shukla
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 05, 2012
Posts: 77

what is the benefit of using a text editor over a shortcut IDE to practice java programming. Or does it really matter if i use any?


Hi Ola,
There are a lot of benefits of using a text editor rather than an IDE for practising coding in java. I have jotted down the points for you so that they do not seem boring ;)
1) As a text editor does not prompt you for errors as soon as you write the code, your mind will be forced to remember tiny details(Which actually matter a lot).
2) You will try and remember methods and which packages to import as recompiling will soon get on your nerves.
3) Since you do not get an auto complete, you will get into the habit of writing your own complete code.
4) Finally, when you write your own code from the beginning to the end, it will soon make you interested in coding and soon enough you will be more confident in this field.

Hope I helped,
Happy coding!!

Regards,
Shivom
 
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