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General Guidance+Java EE tutorial

Rash Tutak
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 07, 2013
Posts: 4
Hello everybody, I recently decided to restart learning Java Language from scratch with a goal to acquire the tools required to work as a Java Programmer. I started with Oracle's Java Tutorial studying the "Trails Covering the basics". I'm thinking of moving on to start some tutorial regarding Java EE. I already have done a Java course in University and developed a couple of projects using Java. I would like to know

1- Are the topics discussed in the Oracle's tutorial"Trails Covering the Basics" sufficient as a base to move on to Java EE?
2- What are some good Java EE tutorials? Preferably Concise.
3- Would the above tools be sufficient to work as typical junior java developer? I'm surprised nothing related to Databases was included in the Basic Java lessons and only a basic introduction to Swing was included, should i recuperate these from other resources?

Thank you.
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender

Joined: Mar 17, 2011
Posts: 7816
    
  21

Rash Tutak wrote:...I'm thinking of moving on to start some tutorial regarding Java EE. I already have done a Java course in University and developed a couple of projects using Java.

My advice: Keep it simple; and don't move on just yet.

There's plenty to know about Java without bothering with external stuff like JEE (which is NOT Java; it's a framework based on Java).

Just for example: Do you really know Java collections? Have you written programs that use all (or most) of the major ones available to you? And could you answer an interviewer that asked you why you might use one over another?

Do you understand concurrency? Or recursion? Or indeed the business of a framework (which is what JEE is)?

Here's an interview question for you: How would you implement a least-recently-used object cache in Java?

None of the above is a requirement for moving on to things that you might see as more "interesting"; but the fact is that the study of programming (like most things) involves the mundane, and getting good at the basics sets you up for all sorts of things - for starters, you'll be able to understand them better.

And if I'm not not explaining myself very well, you might want to read this.

HIH

Winston

Isn't it funny how there's always time and money enough to do it WRONG?
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Rash Tutak
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 07, 2013
Posts: 4
Winston Gutkowski wrote:
Rash Tutak wrote:...I'm thinking of moving on to start some tutorial regarding Java EE. I already have done a Java course in University and developed a couple of projects using Java.

My advice: Keep it simple; and don't move on just yet.

There's plenty to know about Java without bothering with external stuff like JEE (which is NOT Java; it's a framework based on Java).

Just for example: Do you really know Java collections? Have you written programs that use all (or most) of the major ones available to you? And could you answer an interviewer that asked you why you might use one over another?

Do you understand concurrency? Or recursion? Or indeed the business of a framework (which is what JEE is)?

Here's an interview question for you: How would you implement a least-recently-used object cache in Java?

None of the above is a requirement for moving on to things that you might see as more "interesting"; but the fact is that the study of programming (like most things) involves the mundane, and getting good at the basics sets you up for all sorts of things - for starters, you'll be able to understand them better.

And if I'm not not explaining myself very well, you might want to read this.

HIH

Winston


Thanks for the reply. You make a valid point that I shouldn't be in a rush and perhaps practice on stuff i have read till now. I definitely don't know all the small details of Collections by just going through the tutorial, what i got from the tutorial is that i got to know certain functionalities that Java offers and perhaps to go back and reread them if i need to use them. The thing is that I will be doing an Internship in a small SW dev company which uses Java EE, in a month time, so i will get the opportunity to work on real projects and have a mentor but i wanted to go there prepared, atleast knowing about the tech they use if not being completely familiar.
 
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subject: General Guidance+Java EE tutorial