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The moose likes Linux / UNIX and the fly likes Ubuntu versus openSUSE versus Fedora - which one is best for home desktop? Big Moose Saloon
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Ubuntu versus openSUSE versus Fedora - which one is best for home desktop?

Hemanta Bhatt
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 28, 2013
Posts: 10

Please advise as to which Linux-based operating system - Ubuntu versus openSUSE versus Fedora - is best for home desktop. In fact, if you think some other OS is better than the above three, kindly suggest so. Thanks, Hemanta


Hemanta Chandra Bhatt / Hemanta Bhatt
Joe Ess
Bartender

Joined: Oct 29, 2001
Posts: 8927
    
    9

OS X?
Seriously, though, any of the Linux distributions you mention would be fine for home use. The major difference between them being how one would administer the system. Personally, I use Linux Mint. It's based on Ubuntu but uses Gnome window manager (which I prefer) rather than Ubuntu's Unity. Mint also has some software installed by default (Java, Flash, DVD & MP3 playback) that are additional installs in other distributions.
Your best bet is to download a couple of live CD's and try a few distros out before settling on one. You could also install them to a virtual machine using VirtualBox or, in the case of Ubuntu, install it as an application inside Windows.


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Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39408
    
  28
Gnome desktop? I don't like it, but there are all sorts of extensions which you can download and install really easily which improve Gnome no end. The only good thing I would say about Gnome3 is that it is better than Unity, which is the default for Ubuntu. Gnome2 was much better for a large screen, and it has become available again under the name of Mate pronounced Mah′-tay.
You can install any desktop on most versions of Linux; in fact the PC I am using at present has at least 4 different desktops. You can change which to use whenever you log in.

Of course, Joe Ess is right. You can try different versions before you buy. You can downloads Fedora 19 with 4 different desktops here, and try them all for the cost of a rewritable CD. OpenSUSE with two desktops here, and Ubuntu, apparently with only one desktop here. Remember any payment is a voluntary donation.

There are tricks you need to know about partitioning, so please ask when you decide you are ready to install Linux.
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39408
    
  28
I think there are “live” downloads available on all those links I showed you; you can run them from a CD.
Rajdeep Biswas
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 26, 2012
Posts: 186

Did not try Ubuntu, but tried Fedora and OpenSUSE. As my Linux requirements is basically the terminal for learning and executing commands and not for graphical delights (Windows will not be replaced by me), so both are OK. But considering the looks also, OpenSUSE felt better. Moreover, I have heard some rumors:
1. OpenSUSE is optimized for laptops since it consumes less power extending the battery life.
2. Ubuntu is optimized for desktop. And I have seen more Ubuntu and RedHat in desktops than anything else.

But you can install VMWare, and install the free versions of all three from their ISO image files and check. And the moment you find your love, throw the rest out of your electronic life for a while. Enjoy.


The biggest gamble will be to ask a question whose answer you know in that it will challenge your theory | www.TechAspire.blogspot.in
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39408
    
  28
Rajdeep Biswas wrote: . . , I have heard some rumors:
1. OpenSUSE is optimized for laptops since it consumes less power extending the battery life.
2. Ubuntu is optimized for desktop. And I have seen more Ubuntu and RedHat in desktops than anything else. . . .
Where did you hear that? That sounds far‑fetched. I have used all three on laptops and not noticed any battery problems.

RedHat was the predecessor of Fedora. They haven't “made” free RedHat for about 6 years.
Rajdeep Biswas
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 26, 2012
Posts: 186

Rumors have been aggregated from 3-4 online sources over 2 years, sorry can't remember. Open SUSE documentation or notes or somewhere official, I have seen the laptop optimal statement. But I think you may have Windows installed, because as normally in India, maximum users have Windows so that some software or OS fault can be rectified or re-installed easily. Keeping a Linux only system is not very helpful.
1. If Linux is required, it can be installed as a second OS on a different partition, or
2. What I have done is that I have VMWare, so I have installed Open SUSE as a virtual OS, and I am enjoying it without populating my MBR.

But Campbell has more idea, I think he's using Fedora.

Thanks
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16142
    
  21

I always advise checking what's popular in your town. That way, if you have problems, there will be more people who know how to help.

Of course, in my town, that's Debian, and I'm more of a Red Hat person. But I was there before many of them got into Linux. Besides, while smaller local businesses are into Debian, Red Hat and SuSe are the two distros that focus most on enterprise usage and that's my niche. I use Fedora on the desktop, but almost moved to Ubuntu a while back. That wasn't because I needed a more "desktop-friendly" distro as such, but because Fedora was updating itself faster than I could devote time to keeping up. And the Gnome3 desktop.


Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39408
    
  28
Thank you. I have never seen anything about different behaviour on laptops from desktops myself.
Everybody has agreed that there are at least three ways to run Linux:
  • Live CD or similar
  • Virtual machine, VMWare or similar
  • Installed
  • I used to have a laptop with only Ubuntu on, and never had any difficulty with that. But I agree, most people use Linux on a dual‑boot system alongside Windows®. I gave up using one Linux partition ages ago; I use four partitions of different sizes. You have to set the clock differently on a single‑boot system from a dual‑boot system. You can leave lots of space for Windows® if you wish. Remember you can access a Windows® partition easily from Linux but not vice versa.
    Joe Ess
    Bartender

    Joined: Oct 29, 2001
    Posts: 8927
        
        9

    Tim Holloway wrote:I always advise checking what's popular in your town. That way, if you have problems, there will be more people who know how to help.


    It's the 21st century! Check out the distro's user forums (or this handy forum right here). Ubuntu has great forums and I have yet to have a problem with Mint I couldn't solve with a quick search.
    Tim Holloway
    Saloon Keeper

    Joined: Jun 25, 2001
    Posts: 16142
        
      21

    Joe Ess wrote:
    Tim Holloway wrote:I always advise checking what's popular in your town. That way, if you have problems, there will be more people who know how to help.


    It's the 21st century! Check out the distro's user forums (or this handy forum right here). Ubuntu has great forums and I have yet to have a problem with Mint I couldn't solve with a quick search.


    I have a whole case of trophies for "Most Anti-Social Person on Earth", but occasionally, even I like to have the option of having a physical shoulder I can go cry on. Or bribe with a beer or something.

    Especially since there are some problems where people assume the wrong things or explain the wrong way and the system is too crippled to allow remote dialin.

    We also have a strong local Linux User's Group in our fair city, and when they demo cool and useful things, it's nice to be speaking the same platform.
    Jim Venolia
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 07, 2013
    Posts: 154
        
        2

    I consider myself a recovering unix expert. I do have a Linux (Ubuntu) I can boot into on my laptop, but I do so maybe once a year. Instead I run cygwin under Windows. It handles 99% of the times when I want unix, and for the other 1% I have the aforementioned Linux I can boot into.

    It's a no-brainer. We just need to take it to the next level to turn this into a win-win situation. The best practice is to get rid of the low-hanging fruit first. Ping me with an agenda so we can go flag up on this thing
    Hemanta Bhatt
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Sep 28, 2013
    Posts: 10

    Thanks to everyone for their thoughts and insights. I suppose it will be a good idea to install and try these operating systems one by one and then decide which one to go with.

    Hemanta Bhatt
    Jim Venolia
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 07, 2013
    Posts: 154
        
        2

    Hemanta Bhatt wrote:Thanks to everyone for their thoughts and insights. I suppose it will be a good idea to install and try these operating systems one by one and then decide which one to go with.

    Hemanta Bhatt


    Don't do that, it's a lot of work and the differences between the distros isn't enough to repay the time invested in installing, figuring out how to use, and using it enough to decide if you like it. Unless you're either choosing a distro for a group of people to use, or if you're really into installing OS's and climbing the learning curve.

    Just pick one and stick with it.
    Hemanta Bhatt
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Sep 28, 2013
    Posts: 10

    Thanks Jim, even I was wondering about the effort part and would have, in all likelihood, eventually gone with your suggestion "Just pick one and stick with it." I am thinking of starting with Ubuntu and then see how it goes from there. Not sure if I would have the energy to install and try even a second one. Thanks again for your suggestion.
    Campbell Ritchie
    Sheriff

    Joined: Oct 13, 2005
    Posts: 39408
        
      28
    Remember you need four three partitions (I think Ubuntu doesn't use a /boot partition). That way you can retain all the information in the home partition if you ever need to reinstall Linux.
    [Edit: add]You want at least 30GB for the / partition which will leave lots of space to install applications. I have managed to run out of / space at about 20GB before now.[/Edit]
     
    I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
     
    subject: Ubuntu versus openSUSE versus Fedora - which one is best for home desktop?