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Tomcat and Webserver

manoj parida
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 08, 2010
Posts: 5
Hi,

I deployed an Web App in tomcat accessing it by http://localhost:8080/contextroot/. i want to configure webserver and then access it by http://in-devtaxapp.com/contextroot/.

Please suggest how do I go about it.
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 41837
    
  63
You need to sign up for hosting at some Java hosting provider (see http://www.coderanch.com/how-to/java/ServletsFaq#hosting for an incomplete list), and then configure the domain to point to the app running at that provider. You don't necessarily need an extra web server in addition to Tomcat.


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manoj parida
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 08, 2010
Posts: 5
Thanks for reply. At this point I am not looking at anything like this. This is running in one of our dev environment and I am not going to purchase any dns for this. This application only needs to be accessed inside our organization intranet. Please help.
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 41837
    
  63
Then you need to point the DNS A record for
that domain at your server, and configure the Tomcat so that it serves that web app for requests coming in for that domain. Getting rid of the port number 8080 in the URL can also be done if necessary, but let's leave that aside for the moment.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16061
    
  21

Ultimately, all web requests are targeted at an IP address. The IP address of "localhost" is 127.0.0.1 (IPv4) or ::::1 (IPv6, may be missing a ":" or 2). Every machine should have that one defined.

The process of converting a server name to an IP address is called resolving. There are actually quite a number of different resolution mechanisms and most OS's have a list of which ones to use and what order to use them in. DNS is the most famous, but the first resolver in the chain is commonly the "hosts" file, which in Unix/Linux is located at /etc/hosts, and has had several locations in Windows - which also has employed a file named "LMHOSTS".

All resolvers take as their input a fully-qualified domain hostname (FQDN) and emit an IP address. Many will take a simple hostname ("coderanch") and expand it ("coderanch.com", "www.coderanch.com") until they've synthesized a name that resolves as a FQDN. Or, if they run out of options, returns a "Host Not Found" indication.

Resolving returns only IP addresses, not port numbers. If you submit a URL like "http://www.coderanch.com" and don't supply an explicit port number (":8080"), then the well-known port (port 80 for "http" or port 443 for "https") will be what most clients use. To get around that, a proxy or translating mechanism can be set to listen on ports 80/443 and direct the incoming URLs to ports 8080 and 8443. Apache http server is one of the most popular, but there are many others. On Linux, the netfilter mechanism that defines firewalls has the ability to define translation rules.

Your desired URL has no hostname. It's not a FQDN. Since the only way that a URL request can be aimed at the proper machine among what may be thousands of machines on the network domain of in-devtaxapp.com, you'd need to either have to expand that URL to a specific hostname (machine name) such as "mytomcat", which would in a properly defined network be expanded to "mytomcat.in-devtaxapp.com" or name the machine that holds your target Tomcat server to have the name of "www" and let the "www.in-devtaxapp.com" FQDN synthesizers in your resolvers deal with it.


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