aspose file tools*
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes how to get a job in cloud computing Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of Spring in Action this week in the Spring forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Bookmark "how to get a job in cloud computing " Watch "how to get a job in cloud computing " New topic
Author

how to get a job in cloud computing

varsha koli
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 23, 2013
Posts: 7

Hey ranch,

I am a java developer was hoping for a job change and on a job portal found that there are so many opportunities in cloud computing.
can I opt for a career in cloud computing after java development ,If so how should I start looking for job I mean which skills I must have to go for a career in cloud computing? or having java skills only will get me through?

Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42289
    
  64
Since you saw multiple job openings in that field, you can start by analysing what skills they were looking for. After reading a number of job descriptions it should become clear what the most commonly wanted skills are.


Ping & DNS - my free Android networking tools app
varsha koli
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 23, 2013
Posts: 7

yes I was doing that only for a whole day.

Almost all jobs will start with stating some experience in Java/J2EE
and then asking for experience in cloud and cloud related terms cloud architecture, vSphere,Vcloud, private clouds (IAAS/SAAS/PAAS) etc.

so basically they are asking for experience in cloud what if I wanna start newly. ?!
To have a object modelling skills through java programming(OOP) is plus

again we are not gonna developing clouds we are gonna develop for clouds (correct me if I am wrong :SS )

I guess would have to go for vmware certifications.

thanks ulf


Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42289
    
  64
Keep in mind that "cloud computing" is used so broadly these days as to be almost meaningless (I've seen virtual hosting referred to as cloud computing). You should be much more focused on what you intend to do, e.g. developing apps for deployment in something like AWS or GAE is something any experienced Java developer should be able to learn without great difficulties. Same for learning the Hadoop ecosystem. You could do either on your own, and I think knowledge of those would be more valuable than any VmWare certification. But it depends in what specifically you'd like to do.
Dieter Quickfend
Bartender

Joined: Aug 06, 2010
Posts: 543
    
    4

Brush up on cloud terminology and apply for the job. Recruiters work in keywords, meaning that when they hear an architect say the word 'cloud', they will put that in there because they've heard of it. They won't shun your application because there's no cloud in your resume. If you've done something even remotely cloud-related, put it in your resume, explicitly using the keyword 'cloud', and they will take note and it's a +1 for your job interview chance rating. Never lie on your resume or in an interview though, if you don't have any cloud experience whatsoever, don't put it in.


Oracle Certified Professional: Java SE 6 Programmer && Oracle Certified Expert: (JEE 6 Web Component Developer && JEE 6 EJB Developer)
varsha koli
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 23, 2013
Posts: 7

Ulf Dittmer wrote:Keep in mind that "cloud computing" is used so broadly these days as to be almost meaningless (I've seen virtual hosting referred to as cloud computing). You should be much more focused on what you intend to do, e.g. developing apps for deployment in something like AWS or GAE .


I agree, I was also kinda befuddled with cloud terms and number of jobs in the field. Anyway as I wanted to remain a developer I think I should concentrate more on going a step forward from current envioronment; not on hosting services.



varsha koli
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 23, 2013
Posts: 7

Dieter Quickfend wrote:Brush up on cloud terminology and apply for the job. Recruiters work in keywords, meaning that when they hear an architect say the word 'cloud', they will put that in there because they've heard of it. They won't shun your application because there's no cloud in your resume. If you've done something even remotely cloud-related, put it in your resume, explicitly using the keyword 'cloud', and they will take note and it's a +1 for your job interview chance rating. Never lie on your resume or in an interview though, if you don't have any cloud experience whatsoever, don't put it in.


I havn't done anything related cloud uptill now. I am a beginner in terms of development also.That's why was just seeking for any certifications available for cloud computing after seeing some job opportunities in mail box.
And Yes after thorough or little knowledge or work only i'll put it on my resume
K. Tsang
Bartender

Joined: Sep 13, 2007
Posts: 2527
    
    8

If you want to learn or read more about cloud computing, I suggest you start with http://www.whatiscloud.com


K. Tsang JavaRanch SCJP5 SCJD/OCM-JD OCPJP7 OCPWCD5 OCPBCD5
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1776
    
  16

varsha koli wrote:[I am a beginner in terms of development also.That's why was just seeking for any certifications available for cloud computing after seeing some job opportunities in mail box.
And Yes after thorough or little knowledge or work only i'll put it on my resume

  • You could look at playing with things like Amazon Web Services, S3, EC2 etc, which are cloud-based tools allowing you to develop and run applications "in the cloud".
  • Another option is Heroku, which is aimed at developers.
  • Google App Engine (mentioned above) is another cloud-based platform for application development, although it's closely tied to Google's services, so it may be hard to move your application to a different platform e.g. to save money.
  • "Cloud based" platforms are often implemented using virtual machines (which allow system admins to manage these resources much more flexibly and easily). You could have a look at the free VirtualBox just to get a feel for how VMs work, although serious cloud platforms are probably using more sophisticated tools than VirtualBox e.g. OpenStack, Docker etc.
  • You can of course manage your own code "in the cloud", by using an online code repository like GitHub or BitBucket, which is very useful and often good practice these days.
  • There are additional online services that can be integrated with Github, for example, including things like continuous integration.


  • Most of the services and tools above offer free versions, usually with plenty of helpful tutorials to get you started.


    No more Blub for me, thank you, Vicar.
     
     
    subject: how to get a job in cloud computing