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Selecting job profile in case of multiple offers

s ravi chandran
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 20, 2010
Posts: 154
Hi,
I am a java developer with around 4.5 years of experience. I was looking for a change so gave few interviews. Now I have got two offers from two big organizations, but I am now confused with the parameters to consider in selecting one from this. Company A is well known brand, from what I have heard in reviews, it's an easy going life there but remuneration aspect is a bit inconsistent in frequency. Company B is a big name in development circles, work is bit hectic with overtime a usual thing. General review were pointing to work pressure along with good professional growth. Now company B is giving me more than company A.
But I don't know what should I focus on at this point of my career. One thing is settling down in personal front, other is to constantly grow at technology front.
Suggestions are welcome. I know company names will not be ethical here. So not mentioning here.

Thanks
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18896
    
  40

s ravi chandran wrote:
But I don't know what should I focus on at this point of my career. One thing is settling down in personal front, other is to constantly grow at technology front.


Well, is either one of these two options important to you? And if so, how important?


The choices of spending more time with family, or learning bleeding edge technology -- is pretty clear cut to me. However, what is important to me, isn't necessary the same as what is important to you.

Henry
Tim Cooke
Bartender

Joined: Mar 28, 2008
Posts: 1130
    
  59

Flip a coin

It sounds flippant of me to say but there's some seriousness in it too. If you flip a coin and you feel happy with the outcome, then you've made the right choice. If you flip a coin and you feel disappointed with the outcome then you know you prefer the other option.


Tim Driven Development
s ravi chandran
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 20, 2010
Posts: 154
well, both are important to me.. thats the reason I am not able to decide.. balancing should be there. but not all factors are under our control. financial feasibility is imp for sustaining and personal time is also imp. my point is with current career stage, which can be given more importance... maybe in later career stage, the other aspect can become rational..
Chris Barrett
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 05, 2013
Posts: 217
    
  10

Hi Ravi,

I don't think anyone here can give you an answer, as we don't know your situation well enough. 4 - 5 years of Java experience? OK, but how old are you? What's your financial situation? Are you married? Do you plan to get married? These are all questions that you need to really think about and that requires you to be really honest with yourself. This sounds like a fantastic opportunity to make some self-discovery!

I know for myself, when I was 25 years old, my goals were more about beer money for Friday nights and what cool toys I could buy. I also valued my self-worth a lot based on my job title and income bracket. Now, at 40, I'm thinking more about retirement and making sure my wife and kids are happy.

Take some time, and make a list in detail of all the objective and subjective things about the jobs. Try to look at the companies now, in five years and in ten years.

Objective Things
Compare the number of vacation days now versus five years, versus ten years, compare pensions now and in the future, the current pay, stock options, etc.. Many of these things you can find out from the HR paperwork, but comparing future pay is tough, as you don't know where your career or the organization will go.

Subjective Things
Do you like the people at the company? What are the career advancement opportunities? What are the team sizes?

Now, think about where you are now and where you plan to be in five years, or ten years. Think about your personal goals, financial goals and your families. Do you want to relocate? Think also about your personality traits - do you like working in big teams, or small? Do you want to be a leader, or is being a Java developer your passion?

Finally, weight those personal traits and goals by importance and line them up with the objective and subjective things.

Cheers!
Chris
s ravi chandran
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 20, 2010
Posts: 154
Chris R Barrett wrote:Hi Ravi,

I don't think anyone here can give you an answer, as we don't know your situation well enough. 4 - 5 years of Java experience? OK, but how old are you? What's your financial situation? Are you married? Do you plan to get married? These are all questions that you need to really think about and that requires you to be really honest with yourself. This sounds like a fantastic opportunity to make some self-discovery!

I know for myself, when I was 25 years old, my goals were more about beer money for Friday nights and what cool toys I could buy. I also valued my self-worth a lot based on my job title and income bracket. Now, at 40, I'm thinking more about retirement and making sure my wife and kids are happy.

Take some time, and make a list in detail of all the objective and subjective things about the jobs. Try to look at the companies now, in five years and in ten years.

Objective Things
Compare the number of vacation days now versus five years, versus ten years, compare pensions now and in the future, the current pay, stock options, etc.. Many of these things you can find out from the HR paperwork, but comparing future pay is tough, as you don't know where your career or the organization will go.

Subjective Things
Do you like the people at the company? What are the career advancement opportunities? What are the team sizes?

Now, think about where you are now and where you plan to be in five years, or ten years. Think about your personal goals, financial goals and your families. Do you want to relocate? Think also about your personality traits - do you like working in big teams, or small? Do you want to be a leader, or is being a Java developer your passion?

Finally, weight those personal traits and goals by importance and line them up with the objective and subjective things.

Cheers!
Chris


Thanks Chris, I got the points I need to consider. Will have to do a good deal of thinking. I still have many days to think about it. As for the current understanding I have for my own goals. The target is to get involved in high level development work with good deal of technology exposure, that is rare nowadays in our region. Mostly people end up maintaining legacy applications. I don't yet have the knowledge to get into future goal planning. Maybe a bit more time will be required to understand that aspect.

Thanks
Chris Barrett
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 05, 2013
Posts: 217
    
  10

Hi Ravi,

You're welcome - good luck! I can see you've already started the analysis, as a concern of being stuck with legacy code vs new technology wasn't something you mentioned in your original post. I recommend you print out your final analysis and keep it in your employment file. Five years from now, go back and see how close your goals and expectations from today came to reality. This will help you adjust those expectations for the next five years and see how your expectations changed over time. Such refocus can be very enlightening.

Perhaps, as new vs legacy coding seems to be an important weight, take a look at the specific projects the two companies are involved in. Odds are if one company does more legacy code than the other, that's not going to change.

That said, I firmly believe that legacy code management is a "growth" industry. Case in point, I took a mid-level C++ class recently. One of my classmates is a senior Technical Director responsible for a sports franchise in a major video game firm. He was there as a refresher (15 years of management made his C++ rusty). Legacy code, and finding staff capable of maintaining it, is a big concern for them. The "old-guard" programmers are starting to retire. That trend will only accelerate in the next 10 years. It might not be sexy, but maintaining legacy code does pay the bills.

Cheers!
Chris
 
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