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EJB development with a web client

 
Kara C
Greenhorn
Posts: 1
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Hi,
I have just started to use WebSphere Application Developer in the last week and I have ran into difficulities in developing EJB's with a web-based client like JSP or a servlet. I have experience in developing EJB's with SUN's default package(deploytool) but the process is very different with WebSphere. I have worked through some tutorials but I can't get past a certain point!
Here is what I have been doing:
1. I created a new Enterprise Application Project.
2. I created my EJB's in the Appropiate folder, added the appropiate methods and compiled the programs, etc.
3. I then generated the deploy and RMIC code for the Bean
4. I ran the test client to test the bean and I could create a new instance of the bean and play with the methods successfully, etc.
5. I created my web client, in this case a JSP, in the appropiate web folder.
I encounter a problem at this point. I can't compile the JSP because the EJB imports in the JSP are not recognised, the JSP cannot find the beans. If I move the JSP into the same folder as the beans I cannot run them on the server?
I have to be missing a step but I don't know what it is. If anyone has any ideas or a recommended tutorial which addresses these issues I would greatly appreciate it.
Thanks
 
Jay Damon
Ranch Hand
Posts: 282
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Your description suggests that you are attempting to access your EJBs directly from your JSPs. If you are having visibility problems, you may need to Edit Module Dependencies and/or update the Java Build Path for your Web Application module.
However, I would suggest that you reconsider your design. Personally, I would NEVER attempt to access EJBs directly from a JSP. At a minimum, I would create an access or wrapper bean around the EJB and access the EJB through it. Your approach results in a lot of unnecessary code in the presentation layer, i.e. the JSP.
 
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