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Is your(Kyle) book suitable for non-IBM guy?

 
Kui Zhang
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Dear author of Enterprise Java Programming with IBM WebSphere, 2nd Ed
I consider myself a begin-intermediate Java programmer. I started to learn EJB on my own. But I found I progress very slowly. Probably, I do noth have real project to embark upon. Progrmming that conforms to the EJB specification is one thing. Writing DD for the specific application is another. The latter is particularly uneasy.
I also read one of the websphere redbook. It is mainly on IBM's products. I am quite a Java/Oracle guy. Does you book support users like me?
Another particular concern is how well-versed shall I be with design patterns. Design patterns are an art in the first place. But it is too flexible. Knowing when and where to use which pattern(s) turns out to be very hard. Using right patterns with EJB is perhaps even harder. What is the right way to learn EJB and apply it? Your experience is certainly an asset to me.
Is your(Kyle) book suitable for non-IBM guy? However, I still like to join the draw and hopefully get the luck.
Finally, thanks very much for your hard work on this book.
Kui
 
Kyle Brown
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Originally posted by Kui Zhang:
Dear author of Enterprise Java Programming with IBM WebSphere, 2nd Ed
I consider myself a begin-intermediate Java programmer. I started to learn EJB on my own. But I found I progress very slowly. Probably, I do noth have real project to embark upon. Progrmming that conforms to the EJB specification is one thing. Writing DD for the specific application is another. The latter is particularly uneasy.
I also read one of the websphere redbook. It is mainly on IBM's products. I am quite a Java/Oracle guy. Does you book support users like me?
Another particular concern is how well-versed shall I be with design patterns. Design patterns are an art in the first place. But it is too flexible. Knowing when and where to use which pattern(s) turns out to be very hard. Using right patterns with EJB is perhaps even harder. What is the right way to learn EJB and apply it? Your experience is certainly an asset to me.
Is your(Kyle) book suitable for non-IBM guy? However, I still like to join the draw and hopefully get the luck.
Finally, thanks very much for your hard work on this book.
Kui


You are EXACTLY the sort of person we wrote this book for. We introduce the IBM technologies to you and give you both context of where they apply, and the details of how to apply them. We both tell you WHEN to apply the design patterns, and how to apply them, as well as giving you lots of pointers off to where you can find more information on the different design patterns that apply in J2EE.
We focus on the IBM products, but we include trial versions of them in the book so you can try out all the exercises and learn how they work.
Kyle
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Kyle,
I did not find any mention of Web Services in the TOC of the book?
 
Vijay S. Rathore
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Hi Pradeep,
Look at chapters 32, 33 and 34 as well as Appendix B of the Book TOC here
http://www.awprofessional.com/isapi/product_id~{E99F94D1-29B3-4329-A26E-0A90BD1A73C7}/selectDescTypeId~{06B328CA-921B-4395-945D-3078CA6F292A}/st~{75A0BC87-B9B4-435A-86E0-36F0AC8E0923}/session_id~{499C9A3B-4474-4694-98B4-66233FA4202B}/catalog /product.asp
[ January 23, 2004: Message edited by: Vijay S Rathore ]
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Vijay S. Rathore
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Maybe it's incomplete there at Amazon
 
Nicholas Cheung
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Hi Pradeep,
I think there is a mistake by Amazon.
I have read the book in the bookstore, and it does mention WebServices in chapter 33 - 35.
I think it provides a first sight of how WebSphere support WebServices, and how we can develop WebServices applications via WSAD.
Nick.
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Does it cover JAX-RPC AND SAAJ?
 
Kyle Brown
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:
Hi Pradeep,
I think there is a mistake by Amazon.
I have read the book in the bookstore, and it does mention WebServices in chapter 33 - 35.
I think it provides a first sight of how WebSphere support WebServices, and how we can develop WebServices applications via WSAD.
Nick.


You're right. Amazon abruptly cuts off the book at Chapter 31 and does not cover the remaining 5 chapters!
Kyle
 
Kyle Brown
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Originally posted by Pradeep Bhat:
Does it cover JAX-RPC AND SAAJ?

JAX-RPC, yes, in detail. SAAJ -- only at an architectural level. For SAAJ coverage in depth, I'd look at Richard Monson-Haefel's new book in addition to mine.
Kyle
 
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