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Running a Java interpreter on a web sever which has NT4/ sp 6a plus IIS3

rita mistry
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 04, 2001
Posts: 27
Hi all,
I have developed a Java application and I now want to put it on a web server which has NT4 service pack 6a plus IIS3. I just wanted to know what the requirements were for running a Java interpreter on this type of web server.
Would it be better to have a Linux Server or even a clean Windows 2000 box with IIS5.
Any advice and information would be very much appreciated.
Many Thanks,
Rita.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16019
    
  20

Does IIS3 contain the fixes for Code Red? If not, then don't forget to apply them too. I'm still seeing infected machines atempting to share the "joy" every day.
You can front-end Tomcat with either IIS or Apache - or for low-volume and/or local use, bypass them altogether and let Tomcat serve the entire webapp, atatic content and all. For information on how to channel requests from a front-end server, I think you'll find useful how-tos on the jakarta.apache.org/tomcat website.
To supply the Java interpreter, just download it and place it in a convenient location (ex: C:\jdk1.3". As long as the server's PATH includes the JDK\bin directory that will pretty much do it.
For "real-world" work, if you have someone who can support Linux, I recommend it, for security reasons (you may get somewhat better performance as well). However, if you're more comfortable with Windows, stick with that. I know of no compelling reason to prefer Win2K over NT for hosting Tomcat myself.


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