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Small Footprint JBoss

 
Joshua Smith
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All-

Is there a way to run a smaller footprint (less disk space, less memory, less CPU) of JBoss with stripped down functionality?

In particular I'm thinking of client apps in the context of web services that might themselves be servers, but not servers that would be receiving many hits and certainly wouldn't need all of the functionality of JBoss.

Thanks,
Josh
 
Christophe Verré
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There are three server configurations : default, minimal, all.

You can create your own config by creating a new directory and tell jboss to use it at boot time.
For more:

http://wiki.jboss.org/wiki/Wiki.jsp?page=CustomConfiguration
[ February 08, 2006: Message edited by: Satou kurinosuke ]
 
Reid M. Pinchback
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You can prune down the footprint substantially but it takes a lot of experimentation. The obvious thing is to throw stuff away from the deploy directory, but it also matters to remove things from the lib directory as well, and pay attention to stuff mentioned in files in the conf directory. Even services you keep can be pruned down by reducing unwanted interceptors. At the end of the day you'll only know if you got it right when your server *and* your application can still run. Some services don't kick in that much at startup.
 
Joshua Smith
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Thank you.

It would be really interesting to have an app that would watch your web application execute and determine which portions of JBoss are used and which ones are not needed. I wonder if some of the dependency tools might be able to do something like that. It's kind of difficult to determine where to spend your time to get to that perfect footprint quicker.

Thanks,
Joshua Smith
 
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