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The usual book comparison question...

Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Ramnivas,
How would you compare "AspectJ in Action" to Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ and Mastering AspectJ: Aspect-Oriented Programming in Java?


Author of Test Driven (2007) and Effective Unit Testing (2013) [Blog] [HowToAskQuestionsOnJavaRanch]
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Based on the TOCs, relative page count (and title) it seems that AspectJ in Action would be more hands-on than the competitors, am I right?
Does any one of these books have a quick-start for using the AspectJ Eclipse plugin (I'm an Eclipse user so I'd prefer that over a standalone tool)?
Ramnivas Laddad
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 23, 2003
Posts: 62
Lasse,
The documentation that comes with Eclipse/AspectJ compiler should get you started quickly. Once the setup is complete, you can work with an AspectJ project pretty much like any Java project.
-Ramnivas


Ramnivas Laddad
Author, AspectJ in Action (http://manning.com/laddad2)
Twitter: ramnivas
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Ok, I'll download the plugin again (this must be the third time already and I still haven't written any AspectJ code )... Does the AspectJ plugin come with online help by the way (well, I'll see it for myself in a few minutes)?
I'd still appreciate a brief comparison of the books I mentioned, though.
Ramnivas Laddad
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 23, 2003
Posts: 62
Lasse,
It is hard to compare my own book with others! Both the books have some commonality (cover AspectJ 1.1, provide detailed information on language syntax and semantics). The main difference between the books is in the main focus. My book�s focus is on practical applications of AspectJ.
The first part of my book that makes a case for AOP and provides detailed information on AspectJ language along with several simple examples to enhance the understanding. In the second and third part, I take the application-oriented approach to provide practical examples with in-depth coverage. Each of the examples is developed in incremental fashion that you can try along.
My book also features some brand new applications of AOP/AspectJ: multithread safety in Swing, authentication and authorization using JAAS, business rule implementation incorporating Jess. Further, there is a chapter that presents a few AOP design pattern that is my original contribution. Also, realizing that AOP and AspectJ is a new technology, I provide guidance on best route to adopt AspectJ.
I hope this helps.
-Ramnivas
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Fair enough. Your book sure does sound good... Thanks for the description.
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Having read all three books (see my reviews here, here and here), I can maybe shed some light on this. Note that what follows reflects my own personal opinion
Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ by Ivan Kiselev was the very first book on AOP/AspectJ. As I have been working with AspectJ since its inception, I was very eager to read the first book on the subject. At first, it struck me that someone whom I had never seen in the AspectJ community would write THE first book. THE first book is always important in order to draw people's attention. Unfortunately, the book did neither give a really good introduction to AOP nor explain the underlying philosophy. The author just applied AOP concepts on a web application. Moreover, the book was full of typos.
Then, I saw that Nicholas Lesiecki and Joe Gradecki were writing Mastering AspectJ. Knowing the work of those two guys made me feel a little more confident about the quality of the outcome. In fact, that book was on another level. Great introduction to AOP and the philosophy behind, much more consistent, less typos, provision of an extensive resources list on AOP, etc.
Finally, I got to read Ramnivas' AspectJ in Action. I had already seen some excepts on www.theserverside.com, and I was eager to get a copy of that book. I must admit that the introduction really makes a great job of showing the reader what the whole AOP thing is all about. The book takes a hands-on approach and is targeted at practitioners who would like to either get to know AOP and AspectJ or deepen their knowledge about the subject. I have yet to send my feedback to Ramnivas as I have some comments about certain parts of the book.
This is briefly my opinion on the three existing books on AspectJ. In order of preference, I would first buy either Aspect in Action or Mastering AspectJ or both
I hope this helps


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