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Mastering XMI: Java Programming with XMI, XML, and UML by Timothy J. Grose, et al.

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<pre>
Author/s : Timothy J. Grose, Gary C. Doney, Stephen A. Brodsky
Publisher : Wiley Publishing
Category : Miscellaneous
Review by : Valentin Crettaz
Rating : 8 horseshoes
</pre>
This book shows the benefits of using an XML-based standard called the XML Metadata Interchange (XMI). It presents XMI 2.0 as an elegant facility for integrating different heterogeneous systems. One chapter is dedicated to showing how the IBM WebSphere Studio application makes a real-world use of XMI (trial version on the CD-ROM). All Java examples of the book, as well as the XMI Framework, a high-level API for manipulating XMI files, can be found on the CD-ROM. The authors assume that no previous knowledge of XMI, XML, or UML is required. Thus, the first part of the book explains all the necessary XML and UML concepts and goes on with presenting XMI concepts in details.
The second part presents different ways of using XMI. The authors show different algorithms for reverse engineering UML models from XML documents. They also explain how to manipulate simple and complex XMI documents with the standard DOM and SAX XML APIs, as well as with the XMI Framework and the Java Object Bridge (JOB). A special attention is given to XMI schemas that enable powerful validation of XMI documents. It is also shown what role XMI plays in the new Object Management Group's (OMG) software development approach, the Model Driven Architecture (MDA).
This book is an accurate and well written resource that contains simple and clearly explained examples. I would recommend it to any Java software developer who is willing to start or is already using XMI.
More info at Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471384291/javaranch rel="nofollow"> More info at Amazon.co.uk
 
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