aspose file tools*
The moose likes Book Reviews and the fly likes Designing Interfaces by Jenifer Tidwell Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Books » Book Reviews
Bookmark "Designing Interfaces by Jenifer Tidwell" Watch "Designing Interfaces by Jenifer Tidwell" New topic
Author

Designing Interfaces by Jenifer Tidwell

Book Review Team
Bartender

Joined: Feb 15, 2002
Posts: 926
<pre>Author/s : Jenifer Tidwell
Publisher : O'Reilly
Category : Other
Review by : Marc Peabody
Rating : 9 horseshoes
</pre>
Your employers may spend millions on the applications and websites you design and they can't afford you screwing up. Ever.

In Designing Interfaces, Jenifer Tidwell presents nearly a hundred "design patterns" to make your interfaces more user friendly without sacrificing creativity. You will immediately recognize many of these patterns, as the author illustrated them with color screenshots from countless popular websites and software applications such as Google, iTunes, and Excel.

The categories of patterns range from human behavior to aesthetics, addressing your needs to make interfaces both familiar and beautiful. Jenifer Tidwell's insight and consideration for user cognition will make this book a shining gem in your personal library.

The author deserves ten horseshoes but the book only received nine because the interior layout designers simply didn't read the book. Its sans serif typeface and dispassionate layout make it difficult to read more than a few pages in a single sitting. The layout of a design book should amplify the author's words, not dismiss them.

Conclusion: Even if you are ugly and difficult to work with, your interfaces don't have to be. Grab a copy of Designing Interfaces and brace yourself for the praise you'll receive from your users.


More info at Amazon.com
More info at Amazon.co.uk
Book Review Team
Bartender

Joined: Feb 15, 2002
Posts: 926
<pre>Review by : John Wetherbie
Rating : 8 horseshoes
</pre>
Designing Interfaces is not like most books about interface design. It presents "patterns" that the author has seen in Interaction Design and developing user interfaces. The ninety-four patterns are divided into categories with each category/chapter having a brief introduction and overview.

The patterns are somewhat akin to those found in the Gang of Four's Design Patterns book. The first twelve are brief descriptions of how people interact with various aspects of interfaces. The remaining patterns have what, use when, why, how, and examples sections. The how section presents a scenario or design choices for how the pattern can be used. There are multiple figures illustrating the pattern and references to related patterns.

The book's good points are the brief but good content of the chapter overviews, the how sections of each pattern, and the illustrations.

My complaints about the book are minor. When one pattern referenced another I would have liked the page number of the referenced pattern to be listed instead of just the name. I found the gray color of the text a bit tough on the eyes and the font size for the figure descriptions a bit small.

One of the major benefits of the Design Patterns book was that it provided a common vocabulary with which to discuss and communicate software designs. It will be interesting to see if this book has the same effect on interaction and interface design.

Full disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of the book for review.


More info at Amazon.com
More info at Amazon.co.uk
Book Review Team
Bartender

Joined: Feb 15, 2002
Posts: 926
<pre>
Review by : Jeanne Boyarsky
Rating : 10 horseshoes
</pre>
"Designing Interfaces" does for UIs what the Gang of Four did for code. Each chapter starts with a detailed overview of a UI topic with examples of good and bad design. The bulk of the chapter goes into many idioms/patterns that apply to that part of UI design. For example, form design, data presentation and editors are covered in chapter form. There is even a chapter on the emotional effect of pages. The emphasis on user interaction and not just design, distinguishes this book from others.

While there are many books on website design, this one also covers desktop and mobile interfaces. Many principles are the same and differences are highlighted. The author culls some ideas from the website design and usability classics; always making a reference. Other ideas are standards and yet more are original.

The main point of the book is to create a catalog and common language for discussing interface design. At this, the author succeeds fabulously. Each idiom or pattern is given a distinctive name, described with the what/when/why/how and provides examples. Just like Gang of Four, the patterns are appropriately cross referenced. This book is both a great read and a great reference. If you design or make GUI recommendations, you should buy it today!


More info at Amazon.com
More info at Amazon.co.uk
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: Designing Interfaces by Jenifer Tidwell
 
Similar Threads
Pro CSS and HTML Design Patterns by Michael Bowers
Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies
Seeing Data: Designing User Interfaces for Database Systems Using .NET by R. Riordan
Web Services Patterns: Java Edition by Paul B. Monday
Ajax in Action by Dave Crane, Eric Pascarello, Darren James