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Good Intro to Java texts

 
James Chegwidden
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I have taught Java for three years now at the college level. What are some good beginning (no programming experience) Java textbooks (not reference or cert books!)have you found useful?
I like the Malik Java series from Course Tech. For a more comprehensive course we use the Liang Java series from PH.
Remember no Java cert books or reference books- just textbooks from publishing companies.
Ideas? Thoughts?
 
Thomas Paul
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The Murach book by Andrea Steelman is very good for new programmers. I was using the Ivor Horton book that would be a hard book for new programmers. I haven't tried the Course books.
 
Svetlana Koshkina
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When i started, i liked and still appreciate very much Deitel books.
Unfortunately they are very expensive. But they win you by giving most gratifying examples that are working, for a beginner, like me (those days) it was God blessing.
Ironically, while deitel "Java How to program" with swing was made our text book, our uni did not bother to install new jdk (1.2) on its system, so i had to drop out and learn all by myself. But book is really, very good.
Even if you don't make deitel your text book, still, as a teacher, you certainly would benefit from the book that offer very good exercises.
Also, i had "Beginning of Java 2" by wrox by Ivor Horton. It was nice but not as good as deitel though. As a text book, i would think that it would be nice and not that prohibiting in price as deitel and still it has exercises that are challenging but not impossible for a beginner.
Probably, you can go to javaworld.com and see book reviews by Zukowski, usually he gives very valuable assesments.
 
Thomas Paul
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I found the Deitel books too heavy weight. They concentrated too much on Swing and there was a lot of, "don't worry about this now, just code it exactly as it says and we will explain it later."
 
Sue Spielman
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Check out the 'Practical Guide' Series from Morgan-Kaufmann. There are a number of Java books in the series. The books are good for professionals as well as used as textbooks in a number of college level courses. I've written two of the books in the series (Struts and JSTL), but there are about 7-8 of them now.
HTH


Sue
 
Svetlana Koshkina
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:
I found the Deitel books too heavy weight. They concentrated too much on Swing and there was a lot of, "don't worry about this now, just code it exactly as it says and we will explain it later."

I don't argue but i was my learning path and i kind of grateful to the book. Simply did not have any better, perhaps. And it's really expensive.
I'rather buy two or three lesser books now.
I envy students who have so thoughtful teacher though as to find out what is best for them.
 
Jessica Sant
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Now for my plug:
I highly recommend Head First Java by Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates. Its a totally different take on a programming book. There's lots of graphics and code snippets, its REALLY easy to read, and more importantly it won't put you to sleep.
You can read more about the format of Head First here on the WickedlySmart.com website. Like I said, its a totally different take on a programming book, but it works GREAT with my brain. I'm sure it will with yours too.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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