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What is the HF OO book about?

 
Darya Akbari
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Hi,

can someone tell me what is planned for the HF OO book in preparation right now .

Dave Wood gave a hint in this thread. He hints about requirement analysis and I am curious to know whether HF OO will cover topics like Agile and related development methods like Feature Driven Development (FDD) and/or others.

Or will it be a classical OOAD approach followed through the roadmap from Rumbaugh (Domain Side and Application Side Analysis and Design).

Or will it be, because Dave talks about requirement analysis, a description of a whole project life cycle in compliance with the Agile Manifesto.

Can you list some of the important topics in HF OO you plan ?

Regards,
Darya
 
Andrew Monkhouse
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I have moved this to the Bunkhouse Porch.
 
Darya Akbari
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Andrew,

You are always welcome to do so . So far I still wait for Dave to step in and give some answer.

Regards,
Darya
 
Dave Wood
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Hi Darya. Thanks for your interest!

To some extent, I suppose the answer is either "none of the above" or "all of the above" but I'm not sure which.

It is definitely not a book that preaches any single methodology. It's not a book about Agile. It's not a book on RUP. It's not a book on UML. But it doesn't ignore these things, either. Especially UML.

The book's not complete (sadly, not even particularly close), so I can't tell you exactly what will be in it as the details may change a bit...but I'll throw out a few things that will be there...

- a chapter on analysis...how to work though a problem from requirements to an initial object model
- a chapter on writing use cases
- lots of discussion of fundamental OO concepts like encapsulation, polymorphism, coupling, cohesion, etc.
- use of UML throughout, but not complete UML diagram coverage...class diagrams will be very well covered, along with package diagrams, sequence diagrams, object diagrams, and possible one or two others
- high-level discussion of topics like design patterns, frameworks, refactoring, anti-patterns, etc.
- discussion of object-to-relational mapping
- use of Java for most examples that involve code...some bits of C++ and C# are also thrown in here and there
- and much much more!!! (how's that for marketing spin?!)

Hope that helps a bit.

-Dave

PS: I can't make any promises, but if people have OO topics that they feel very strongly should be included in a book like this, I'm open to suggestions.
 
Darya Akbari
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Hi Dave,

thanks for your response. I see lots of interesting topics.


Dave wrote:

I suppose the answer is either "none of the above" or "all of the above" but I'm not sure which.


You say neither nor , but there must be something implicit that drives you. Isn't the overall goal to describe an OO Software Development Process?

Don't you want to provide a tangible project life cycle to the reader so that people can learn how to go through all project phases in an OO manner. This in HF style instead of boring texts.

Otherwise to my opinion it becomes fuzzy, because you say a little bit here and a little bit there. But having all your topics chained according to a project life cycle would build up the topics (you already have) on each other and leads the reader to tangible results.

I can't find any better than to bring requirement analysis, design patterns, UML, diagrams, object models, etc. into action other than a project life cycle.

What do you think? It's just a suggestion from my side

Regards,
Darya
 
Dave Wood
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Originally posted by Darya Akbari:
Isn't the overall goal to describe an OO Software Development Process?


While this could be a perfectly good goal, it's actually not the goal of this book. The goal of this book is to teach a wide variety of OO stuff. The topics covered by the book can be used regardless of your process of choice. My concern would be that selecting a specific process would actually unnecessarily reduce the number of people interested in the book. Someone not using Agile (for example) might say "oh, this sounds like an interesting book, but we're not doing Agile, so I guess it won't apply."

Does that make some sense?

I think "Head First Agile" might make for an interesting book, BTW...?
 
Jesus Angeles
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Hi Dave,

Looking forward to your book, no pressures though

What is the exact title? Head First Object-Orientation?

How to we differentiate this book with regards to content goal versus these books: distilled uml by fowler, ooad and the unified process by larman, hf design patterns

i am looking forward to reading hf design patterns, and prepare for scea, but prefer reading hf books than the one by fowler or larman. so i want to add your book on my list.

hf oo sounds like its the phase before c++, the underlying basis of c++ and java.

just want to get a feel on what the book contains...i think some of my questions above have been answered early in this topic already
 
Dave Wood
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Hi Jesus,

I'll try to address you questions in terms of comparisons to other books...

UML Distilled is very much a UML book. My book, along the way, will teach you the things you're most likely to need to know about UML, but it's not a "UML book."

HF Design Patterns is a Design Patterns book. That is, most of the material in it is focused on specific patterns. Having said that, it does also have a lot of good design guidelines, some of which overlap with material that will be in my book.

I'm not sure which Larman book you're referring to, as I can't find one that matches the title you mentioned. I'm guessing there's a fair amount of overlap with something like "Applying UML and Patterns" though I have only skimmed that book, to be honest.


Hope that helps.

Oh, and as for the title, it will probably end up as "Head First Objects" (with a subtitle along the lines of "Object-Oriented Software Development with UML"). But we haven't nailed that down yet.

-dave
 
Juhan Voolaid
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Originally posted by Dave Wood:
I'll throw out a few things that will be there...

- a chapter on analysis...how to work though a problem from requirements to an initial object model
- a chapter on writing use cases
- lots of discussion of fundamental OO concepts like encapsulation, polymorphism, coupling, cohesion, etc.
- use of UML throughout, but not complete UML diagram coverage...class diagrams will be very well covered, along with package diagrams, sequence diagrams, object diagrams, and possible one or two others
- high-level discussion of topics like design patterns, frameworks, refactoring, anti-patterns, etc.
- discussion of object-to-relational mapping
- use of Java for most examples that involve code...some bits of C++ and C# are also thrown in here and there
- and much much more!!! (how's that for marketing spin?!)

Hope that helps a bit.

-Dave

PS: I can't make any promises, but if people have OO topics that they feel very strongly should be included in a book like this, I'm open to suggestions.


Nice.

Looks like another must in my bookshelf.

Topic about analysis (and design) - make sure it will be detailed enaugh. I'm just learning that stuff at school and they all make a big bubble out of it. I would like to know how to divide big picture to smaller subsystems, how they communicate and what they share and what comes next to a very detail of a good project design.

Allso frameworks or something - I would like to see best practices of doing a big projects. Like a infosystem for several different users - how to see it as one, not several separate programs.

OK I guess you see how dumb (one of) your book readers are so - make us smarter


Allso after seeing the teaser at http://www.hfoobook.com one thing came to my mind. The model pics - the chick and the china dude. I think after reading several hf books readers should be done with those. How about some new faces?

ok thanx ... tr00 fan
[ September 11, 2005: Message edited by: Juhan Voolaid ]
 
Daniel Rhoades
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HF OO sounds good to me, I would like to see a HF book cover the OO s/w dev process - you can't research this enough! I would be nice to see the book talk about the different models and methologies - without preaching one or the other.

A HF UML book is needed I think... as is a HF J2EE Patterns (HF Design Patterns was a good book btw).

UML distilled is a good book, but it's more of an overview, not really how to use UML on every day projects...

I wonder if Sun will ever bring out a UML exam like IBM's?
 
Ilja Preuss
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Originally posted by Daniel Rhoades:

UML distilled is a good book, but it's more of an overview, not really how to use UML on every day projects...


If you don't want to wait for HF UML, you might want to take a look at Robert C. Martin's "UML for Java Programmers".
 
Darya Akbari
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What are you doing guys . First it was April 2006, then September 2006 now it's going to be November 2006 .

At least this is what Amazon.com says. Are you reshaping the book to cover more than only OO, like adapting OO into a software process . If so, I would only be happy to see that.

Regards,
Darya
 
Bert Bates
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Hi Guys,

A month or two ago we had a second review team do a very complete audit of the book in progress. At that point we determined that we needed to make some adjustments to the contents. We're sorry for the delay, but our philosophy is that we'd rather be late but get it right, than be on time with the wrong topics!

Thanks for your patience!

Bert
 
Darya Akbari
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Originally posted by Bert Bates:
... our philosophy is that we'd rather be late but get it right, than be on time with the wrong topics!

Bert


That's very true .
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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