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Cohen book: Design

 
Jeff Langr
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Greetings Mr Cohen,

I took a look at the Amazon blurb on your new book (congrats!). While the word "Design" is prominently featured in the title, the Amazon review didn't make much note of it. Can you discuss what your book covers with respect to design (and its impacts on/from design)?

thanks,
Jeff
 
Frank Cohen
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Hi Jeff: Thanks for your interest in Java Testing and Design: From Unit Testing to Automated Web Tests (JTD.)

JTD is the first book to make the case that delivering services � software application functionality delivered over routed networks and open protocols � requires the combined effort of software developers, QA technicians, and IT managers. In my experience those three groups rarely cooperate. It's more like they put up with one another. So, when it's time to make design decisions for a new project or on maintaining an existing service there is rarely group discussion on the best design to use. JTD educates software developers, QA technicians, and IT managers on the available protocols, tools, and techniques to deliver services. For example, choosing tightly coupled n-tier server architectures over loosely-coupled multiple server designs. JTD encourages a build-it-to-be-tested design philosophy. That's the "design" part of Java Testing and Design.

I hope this answered your question. Please let me know.

Thanks.

-Frank
 
Jeff Langr
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Thanks Frank!
 
Kishore Dandu
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Frank:

Since you mentioned some insights into multi-network interoperable systems(probably in web context), does the book address or suggest good practises for this interoperability.

I am asking this because lately there is lot of noice about web-services, but with personal experience some requirements does not need this approach(sometimes good old urlconnection suffices for minimum frequency operations).

Let me know.
 
Frank Cohen
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Hi Kishore: I like simplicity too and sometimes the minimal approach works best. For example, if you are in control of the client/consumer and the service/server then why go through all the trouble of using SOAP when an HTTP Post with some XML in the payload will work just fine. This is the attitude Java Testing and Design takes when discussing architectural and design issues. It assumes that the software developer making protocol, library, and architectural choices is under the normal amount of stress � i.e. lots! - and needs to solve a problem quickly. Java Testing and Design begins with the "Forces at Work Affecting Your Web-Enabled Software." One tenth of it is about technology the rest of this chapter is about human nature.

Java Testing and Design suggests practices for achieving interoperability by describing the protocols and technologies available to software developers, including Java and .NET. It then shows the typical problems that come with each choice, including interoperability and scalability problems. For example, Java developers are regularly told by Sun to use SOAP RPC-encoding. The book shows that choosing SOAP RPC-encoding can lead to a 3000% decrease in throughput over the other encoding styles. Plus, SOAP RPC-encoding does not interoperate with .NET services easily.

-Frank
 
Alexandru Popescu
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Originally posted by Frank Cohen:
Java Testing and Design suggests practices for achieving interoperability by describing the protocols and technologies available to software developers, including Java and .NET. It then shows the typical problems that come with each choice, including interoperability and scalability problems.

On what basis/tests are these interoperability/scalability results done?

Java developers are regularly told by Sun to use SOAP RPC-encoding. The book shows that choosing SOAP RPC-encoding can lead to a 3000% decrease in throughput over the other encoding styles. Plus, SOAP RPC-encoding does not interoperate with .NET services easily.

This is quiet easy to understand ;-).

./pope



-Frank[/QB]
[ October 08, 2004: Message edited by: Ali Pope ]
 
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