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What does this mean?

 
Michael Huber
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I see this alot people that ask that you know and understand Formal QA methodologies. I mean I thought that QA testing was just testing out the program in every possible senario to see if it works. Are there formal steps to test a program???

anyone got some tutorial links??

and what is automated testing??


Thanks, any help is much appreciated!
 
Lasse Koskela
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Originally posted by Michael Huber:
I see this alot people that ask that you know and understand Formal QA methodologies. I mean I thought that QA testing was just testing out the program in every possible senario to see if it works. Are there formal steps to test a program???
The term "formal testing" usually refers to a process where the tests to be carried out are documented beforehand, then executed, and the results documented.

Non-formal testing would, in this context, refer to tests carried out "ad hoc", i.e. without up-front planning of what to test and how to test.

Originally posted by Michael Huber:
and what is automated testing?

Automated testing is just that -- automated testing. For example, take a typical test case for a web application. The test case probably starts with some kind of initialization (set up test data, go to main page, log in, etc.), continues with a sequence of actions (click this, click that, etc.), and includes all sorts of visual checks along the lines of "when you come back to this page, the value in field X should be Y".

Manually executing this sort of a test case isn't much fun -- at least in my opinion. It's a lot of work and doesn't require much activity in your frontal lobe...

Automated testing to rescue!

If you take another look at the generic test case I described, can you think of something you could not automate with scripts executed by a computer (written in Java, Python, Perl, Ruby, C#, whatever you prefer)? These days, a significant portion of test cases for web applications, for example, are perfectly capable of being automated with tools like HttpUnit, jWebUnit, HtmlUnit, Jameleon, etc.

The biggest obstacles are if you're using JavaScript heavily in the user interface since Rhino, for example, only implements standard JavaScript features and not all browsers follow the standards so well... Furthermore, even though Rhino implements the whole of JavaScript 1.5, the higher level libraries like HttpUnit, for example, seem to always lag behind.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
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