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Refactoring to Patterns - book questions

 
Alvin chew
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hi, is this book's sample code focus in pure java ?
 
Nicholas Cheung
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I guess there may not be codes, or, should be psudo codes that can be applied in various language, not only Java.

As the book focus on categories of refactoring, and thus, it may not contain much codes.

Nick
 
Lasse Koskela
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From the book description at Amazon.com:
I use Java examples in this book. I find that Java tends to be easy for most object-oriented programmers to read. I�ve gone out of my way to not use fancy Java features, so whether you code in C++, C#, Visual Basic .NET, Python, Ruby, Smalltalk, or some other object-oriented language, you ought to be able to understand the Java code in this book.


Fowler's refactoring book also contained quite a lot of code examples. I believe it's essential for the kind of refactorings he described. I haven't seen Josh's book yet so I can't really say how much code it has in proportion to UML diagrams.
 
Alvin chew
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this is the table of contents for refactoring to pattern book by Joshua kerievsky

 
Alvin chew
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when i first scan on TOC, i found that this book focus more on refactoring and cover little on pattern ...am i right ?
 
Lasse Koskela
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Originally posted by Alvin chew:
when i first scan on TOC, i found that this book focus more on refactoring and cover little on pattern ...am i right ?

Yes. Joshua's book is about refactoring to patterns, not refactoring and patterns.
 
Joshua Kerievsky
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Ralph Johnson (one of the authors of Design Patterns) recently noted tha the refactorings in my book could easily be called patterns or refactorings. So I like to think that the book is about both refactoring and patterns. I certainly include lots of discussions about pattern implementations and competing patterns -- though I don't go into the detail found in the Design Patterns Implementation Notes.

The book does contain a LOT of code. The code is written in Java. There are also plenty of UML 2.0 diagrams. As I said in the book, I find that most C#/C++/OO developers can understand the code (we've tested it on a wide variety of folks in our workshops).
 
Alvin chew
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mr.Joshua Kerievsky, could you please introduce yourself ? do you wrote this book with developer view ? thank you !
 
Nicholas Cheung
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my book could easily be called patterns or refactorings

Will you rename your book in the next edition?

In addition, did you cover fundemental concepts of refactoring in your book?

Nick
 
Alexandru Popescu
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Originally posted by Joshua Kerievsky:
[...] easily be called patterns or refactorings. So I like to think that the book is about both refactoring and patterns [...]


This sounds interesting for me :-/. afaik these are way to different. maybe I can use some refactoring to use patterns, but the other way around???

Please enlighten me.

./pope

PS: i would like to read this immediately to better understand
 
Ko Ko Naing
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

In addition, did you cover fundemental concepts of refactoring in your book?


Nick, sample chapter-2 is about fundemental concepts of refactoring... I read it yesterday and I found out that beginners will find it really useful for them...

Especially the nature of refactoring and types of refactoring such as composite refactoring and test-driven refactoring are discussed there in chapter-2...

It's really worth that we got that chapter to taste the book...
 
Alvin chew
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will this book go though on how to use IDE for refactoring as well ?
 
Nicholas Cheung
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Hi Ko Ko,


sample chapter-2 is about fundemental concepts of refactoring... I read it yesterday and I found out that beginners will find it really useful for them...

I mean the fundemental concepts for each category, not only that of refactoring.

Nick
 
Nicholas Cheung
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will this book go though on how to use IDE for refactoring as well ?

If there is, I guess it maybe Eclipse or NetBean, as they are free.

Nick
 
Alexandru Popescu
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Originally posted by Alvin chew:
will this book go though on how to use IDE for refactoring as well ?


Why should you consider interesting to read this inside a book? I should read this instead in my IDE help, rather to a book.

./pope
 
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