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J2EE Pattern

murls76
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 17, 2001
Posts: 2
Greetings Mr.Clifford J. Berg,

I would like to know the best pattern that you came across along with the suitable justification for the pattern to be an optimal one. Of course, the patterns were chosen based on the situation/complexity/business need and other performance factors. Cosidering the growing technology on the cutting edge side, which pattern will suit better and can provide optimal solution for any kind of Application development? I mean, a generic pattern. If no pattern exists, will be it be a good idea to develop a generic pattern which can benefit the application developers across the globe?

Friendly regards,
Murali
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Sometimes a hammer is better than a screwdriver, sometimes the other way around.

Similarly, they cannot be a "best, generic pattern". There can only be patterns that a good idea to be applied in a specific situation.


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
Michael Ernest
High Plains Drifter
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 25, 2000
Posts: 7292

"murls76" -

Please review our site naming policy and alter your display name accordingly. Thanks.


Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.
- Robert Bresson
Cliff Berg
Author
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 16, 2006
Posts: 22
Hi Murali,

I agree with a poster below that there can be no "best pattern".

However, I will respond by saying that I admire the work done by the Gang of Four, Martin Fowler, and many others.

I think that patterns need to evolve to have a more semantic approach. Most patterns are expressed structurally. E.g., even though the GOF patterns are divided into structural and non-structural patterns, they are all expressed using class diagrams - i.e., structurally. A great many of the most useful patterns are not structural, but are semantic. E.g., many patterns really center around which components should access which other components for various functions. This can be expressed (and should be) without class diagrams.

I think we have a ways to go in terms of a language for expressing truly useful patterns.
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Originally posted by Cliff Berg:

I think that patterns need to evolve to have a more semantic approach. Most patterns are expressed structurally. E.g., even though the GOF patterns are divided into structural and non-structural patterns, they are all expressed using class diagrams - i.e., structurally. A great many of the most useful patterns are not structural, but are semantic. E.g., many patterns really center around which components should access which other components for various functions. This can be expressed (and should be) without class diagrams.


I agree with you, although I'm not sure that the class diagrams in the GoF book really were meant to be central to the pattern description. After all, class diagram wise, many of the patterns look very alike, although being totally different in intent. Just contrast Proxy to Decorator...
Don Morgan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 24, 2003
Posts: 84
As others have pointed out, there really is no such thing as the "best" pattern, so I would like to add a twist to the question: what patterns are the most commonly used on real systems?

In no particular order, the most common I have used are the Factory Pattern, Command Pattern, Template Method, MVC and Layers.


Don Morgan, Founder
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subject: J2EE Pattern