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High-Assurance Design

paul wheaton
Trailboss

Joined: Dec 14, 1998
Posts: 20729
    ∞

Well, the title certainly grabbed my attention.

Is the book java centric?

As a java developer, what might be something for me to consider?


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Cliff Berg
Author
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 16, 2006
Posts: 22
Hi Paul,

Yes, the book is Java-centric. But it is not a book with much code in it, so someone without Java knowledge would be able to read it as long as they have experience with business application development.

As you are a Java developer, I would note that I am too. As a Java developer, one of the more interesting chapters might be the exception handling discussion. Another chapter that is especially relevant to Java programming is the discussion of multi-threading, since many of the examples are most easily implemented using a Java-like thread paradigm.

- Cliff
paul wheaton
Trailboss

Joined: Dec 14, 1998
Posts: 20729
    ∞

Yes, I am a java developer. I even made a web site about java a few years ago

I guess I'm kinda trying to fish around for architectural approaches that would be discussed in the book without popping down to the bookstore. The stuff I've read so far sounds like it could apply to anything.

Recently I've seen a lot of shift away from EJB. And I think this shift is wise. And I've seen a lot of shift toward spring - and I'm not sold that this helps with the needs of large scale stuff.

The shops that have really grabbed my attention are those that are scaling back to just servlets (or something servlet like). I've also heard a few nice things about jini (but then again, I have a friend that is a bit of a jini evangelist).

So I spent a little time poking around trying to see where your book fits in with this angle. And now I'm taking a lazy shortcut and just asking you.
Cliff Berg
Author
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 16, 2006
Posts: 22
Paul, I see where you are coming from. I agree with you. Spring is certainly compelling. I like declarative systems, because they are more design-like. One thing the book does not do is compare technologies. In fact, I originally wrote the book with alot of material on the Java security model and other technologies. I took all of that material out. It made for a shorter book, but it also allowed me to focus on design principles. The lifecycle of technologies is becoming shorter and shorter - in some cases a few years. What will replace Spring, and when? Do you see my point? But what doesn't change is the set of issues and design patterns. That is where the book focuses. The book takes the ideas and lessons that have been developed and learned by the security and reliability communities and writes those lessons in a format that is digestible to a business application software architect or developer.
 
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subject: High-Assurance Design