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GCC Book

 
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The only other GCC book I have seen (the GNU one) is really not much more than the contents of the 'man' page. I hope yours is more than that. I am intrigued by a book dedicated to a compiler. It is not billed as a C or C++ primer but specifically about the compiler.

The Amazon descriptions and reviews sound promising. Still it makes me wonder about 500+ pages about the compiler. Maybe I'll win the book and find out!
 
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Well, I'd certainly be happy if you bought one (and liked it, of course ;-), but here's some additional info on the contents. It's not just about GCC, but also about related tools such as automake, autoconf, gprof, gcov, libtool, and so on. There's a chapter on building GCC as a cross-compiler in various ways (run on one platform, produces code for another), and another on using GCC with different libraries than the vanilla glibc. There are also chapters dedicated to using each of the main compilers in the GCC collection (C, C++, Fortran, and Java - no Ada).

GCC is a large, valuable suite of compilers and is used in so many different ways that it wasn't hard to come up with 500 pages of what I think is useful info. There are, of course, huge appendices on options (one vanilla one, on platform-specific one) that are somewhat like man info, but I tried to provide more useful information in the option descriptions than you find in the man page or online docs. If you get a copy, I hope that you agree - I'd love any suggestions or comments!

Bill
 
andrew pierce
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I am interested in learning more about autoconf, automake, and libtoo as these are essentials on development on Linux. I've worked all along with them, knowing they are there, but not knowing too much about the real power within them. This definitely piques my curiosity. I'll put the book on my Amazon wish list.

Thanks for the additional information.
 
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If you're looking for more info on the autotools, there's also the definitive book on them:

http://sourceware.org/autobook/

autoconf has changed significantly since the book, but the book is still very useful to come up to speed on the various tools.

Tim
 
andrew pierce
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Very cool. I hadn't seen this one before. Thanks!
 
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