• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Ron McLeod
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • paul wheaton
  • Tim Cooke
  • Henry Wong
Saloon Keepers:
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
  • Frits Walraven
  • Piet Souris
Bartenders:
  • Mike London

Ajax and other frameworks

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Considering AJAX is basically Javascript, can it be integrated seamlessly with different types of frameworks such as Struts?
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 64
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Struts is a server-side framework; the two don't get in eachothers way. Using AJAX in a portal environment can be tricky though.
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 25
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
AJAX plays well with others and Struts is no different than any servlet, so you should be OK. The question that I am having is the whole MVC paradigm which is in a way changed by AJAX. You can have multiple AJAX components in the same page and there is very little that these can do to notify each other of their states. So, it is not like Flex where components are aware of their neighbor's states and can change accordingly. In AJAX this kind of behavior will have to be maintained manually, which is not so easy.

Another thing to consider is the notion of user interface state as a whole. AJAX will not help in maintaing this, on the client. You can try to keep in on the server, but then you'll have memory issues.

Lastly, there is the issue of cross-browser JS compatibility. In a recent project we had to spend considerable amount of time making an AJAX app work well in IE and Firefox.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic