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XML Book

 
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I'm writing an XML parser for TI-89/92+ and Voyage 200 graphing calculators (don't let the word "calculator" fool you, these machines are more advanced than most low-end palm-pilots), and I was wondering (exactly) what sorts of issues this book covers, will it be of any use to my current task?
 
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The main thing you'll learn is not to skimp on XML support. As a parser author, you need to understand XML at a level much deeper than that of a casual developer. Common mistakes novice parser vendors have made in the past include ignoring the internal DTD subset, assuming mixed content doesn't exist, assuming order doesn't matter, assuming documents have schemas and that those that do have schemas are in fact valid. None of these are true as often as people assume.
Items 13, 14, 29, 31, 32, 33, and 34 are probably the most relevant:
  • Remember mixed content
  • Allow all XML syntax
  • Always use a parser
  • Program to standard APIs
  • Choose SAX for computer efficiency
  • Choose DOM for standards support
  • Read the complete DTD
  • Navigate with XPath

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    Originally posted by Elliotte Rusty Harold:

    Items 13, 14, 29, 31, 32, 33, and 34 are probably the most relevant:

  • Remember mixed content
  • Allow all XML syntax
  • Always use a parser
  • Program to standard APIs
  • Choose SAX for computer efficiency
  • Choose DOM for standards support
  • Read the complete DTD
  • Navigate with XPath


  • Most of the chapters listed up there are avaiable as HTML format in this page. They are chapter 14, 31, 33... At least it might be helpful...
     
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    ignoring the internal DTD subset, assuming mixed content doesn't exist, assuming order doesn't matter, assuming documents have schemas and that those that do have schemas are in fact valid. None of these are true as often as people assume.
    Something I call The Implicit Assumptions. Such things
    are never mentioned in the Requirements Docs or the Design Docs.
    And when you call a attention to the problems that are discovered,
    its always Gee, I thought...
    My two cents..........
     
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