• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • paul wheaton
  • Rob Spoor
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
  • Frits Walraven
  • Tim Moores
Bartenders:
  • Mikalai Zaikin

XSLT 2.0 Web Development : XML Software

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 44
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
just for my curiosity, what softwares does Mr.Dmitry Kirsanov mentioned in this chapter?

personally, for XML/XSLT tools, I am only familar with XMLSPY. I'd like to know other softwares which are good at XML editing, espcially those can create XSLT visually.

Thanks....
 
Author
Posts: 33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tools for creating XSLT visually do exist (e.g. Stylevision from Altova), but they're not too useful in my opinion. At least in Java or C++, you can visually build a GUI, but XSLT is not a language for building GUIs. It's a language for manipulating XML data, and it's hard to imagine a better way to convey your intent than to write it down as a sequence of templates. XSLT is a high-level language, which means the distance between the idea of a program and its actual implementation is relatively small.
 
Hank GU
Ranch Hand
Posts: 44
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, Mr.Dmitry Kirsanov.

I do agree that XSLT is a high-level language for manipulating XML data, so I do not expect an ideal software which can do whatever you want intelligently. A rough GUI is enough. just like JSP, most of the time, I will use DreamWaver to made those HTML presentation ready before I process to add those java things in. in this sense, Stylevision is not bad.


May tell me what are other XML software you mentioned in this chapter? just a bit curious. Thanks!
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 62
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use NetBeans for creating and editing XML. It does a fairly good job of color coding and tag completion and it provides menu actions for checking and validating the XML. It also has a built in XSLT translator.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 146
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hank,

If you prefer using a GUI to build your pages, go ahead and use dreamweaver to build the html and then insert your <xsl:???> tags to display your xml.

Check out W3C's tutorial on xslt for any future info : http://www.w3schools.com/xsl/default.asp

Regards,
Dave
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 995
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Another great tool I use for working with xml and xslt is <oXygene/> (sorry I don't have the link near-by).
 
Dmitry Kirsanov
Author
Posts: 33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Stylevision is, in a way, an extremity; it's really only useful for XML-to-HTML kind of XSLT, and the results from its drag-n-drop sessions are usually very rough and only usable as a starting point for further refinement. If however what you need is source-oriented editing with additional XSLT-specific conveniences, then your choice is much wider and more meaningful. Oxygen, Topologi CME, Komodo are all worth checking out, plus you have XSLT plugins or modes for tranditional IDEs and text editors (jedit, Emacs). Altova's offerings are good too, though they have the disadvantage of being Windows-only, and in my opinion they don't have so much edge over the competition as to justify that.
 
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic