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Simon ?

 
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Simon,
I'm trying to understand what a typical J2EE server farm configuration would look like. I realize there is not one answer for this. Sometimes one may want to run their EJB applications seperate from their web applications (on different servers) and sometimes together. One of my points of confusion is whether or not the web server (i.e. Apache) should run on the same server as the web application (i.e. Tomcat). I'm not using those products, just naming them as examples. I'm thinking mirrored identical servers would be the easiest configuration to maintain, and for all I know perform the best. Maybe not, and maybe you lose load balancing flexibility. I'm not sure if this question is clear, maybe an example or two would help.
For example, would the following be a typical configuration (again, I just name the products for the purpose of the question):
1) 1.2 Ghz Intel box w/Linux/Apache/Tomcat/JBoss
2) 1.2 Ghz Intel box w/Linux/Apache/Tomcat/JBoss
3) Sun Solaris low end server running Oracle.
or does the web server need to reside on it's own server and if so why?:
1) 1.2 Ghz Intel box w/Linux/Apache
2) 1.2 Ghz Intel box w/Linux/Tomcat/JBoss
3) Sun Solaris low end server running Oracle.
It would seem to me that from a production configuration maintenance perspective, things would be much simpler with example one.
Thanks in advance,
Mike
[ March 29, 2002: Message edited by: Mike Jones ]
[ March 29, 2002: Message edited by: Mike Jones ]
 
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Hi Mike,
I am moving this to a more a appropriate forum "General Computing" where you should be able to get some good feed back.
Matt
 
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Uh, Simon who?
 
Mike Jones
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Simon Song from the WebSphere Forum. Matt (the sheriff) didn't think my question belonged in that forum. He claimed I would have good luck here getting GREAT advice.
Mike
 
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Here I am...
Seperating the WebServer and Servlet Container makes sense for real enterprise deployment,
1. Easy maintenance, you can have two version of appservers running side by side, and switch to the production release as needed.
2. Sometimes it will give you better performance, if you have lots of static contents. WebServer itself has caching technology to boost static content services, like in Apache(though, I think it is not that robust...maybe better in latest release)
3. Load balancing, Websphere gives you full capability to load balance at every layer. So if you want, you can load balance your webserver seperately from your servlet container.
http://publib-b.boulder.ibm.com/Redbooks.nsf/RedpieceAbstracts/sg246192.html
4. Security issue, webserver is vulnerable to hackers. You can even have firewall between webserver and servlet container to protect your applictions from hackes(maybe you DB password, etc.)
My suggestion is for low volume applications, you won't see any benefit of seperating webserver from servlet container. You can start from your option1, and if you see webserver becomes a bottleneck(or security issue) you can scale without technical issues on Websphere.
Read through the redpieces, it gives you valuable information!
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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