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Q #24, Marcus Green ..... yield() method of threads

 
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Question 24)
Under what circumstances might you use the yield method of the Thread class
1) To call from the currently running thread to allow another thread of the same priority to run
2) To call on a waiting thread to allow it to run
3) To allow a thread of higher priority to run
4) To call from the currently running thread with a parameter designating which thread should be allowed to run
I think the answer should be both 1 and 3, however the answer is only 1..can some one explai ..why not it also allows the threads of higher priority to run???
Wali
 
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WaliM,
yield() is a static method. So, it affects only the currently executing thread. The answer "3" is partly wrong. When yield() is called it makes the currently executing thread to yield for some other thread to execute. The next thread that executes could be of the same or higher priority bit not necessarily higher, it could even be the same thread which had called yield(). In retrospect, answer "1" should have been worded a bit differently. IMHO, it should have been "same or higher", to remove any ambiguity.
Please, feel free to correct me.
regards,
Ankur
 
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Thanks for your repluy Ankur
I was also thinking the same way that it should be "same or higher priority threads"...
Wali
 
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Originally posted by Ankur:
WaliM,
yield() is a static method. So, it affects only the currently executing thread. The answer "3" is partly wrong. When yield() is called it makes the currently executing thread to yield for some other thread to execute. The next thread that executes could be of the same or higher priority bit not necessarily higher, it could even be the same thread which had called yield(). In retrospect, answer "1" should have been worded a bit differently. IMHO, it should have been "same or higher", to remove any ambiguity.
Please, feel free to correct me.
regards,
Ankur


I am not so sure. This again depends a lot on the scheduling algorithms on the target environment. I think the autor said
"to allow another thread of the same priority to run" on the assumption that if there were a thread of priority higher than this, then this thread would have been interrupted for the thread of higher priority anyway..
Just my 2 cents.
Savithri
 
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