• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Paul Clapham
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Knute Snortum
Sheriffs:
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Tim Cooke
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Joe Ess
  • salvin francis
  • fred rosenberger

Transfering to POJO

 
Sheriff
Posts: 14691
16
Eclipse IDE VI Editor Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would like to know how difficult it would be to :

1. Change a traditional J2EE experienced programmer into a POJOs guru
Would it need a complete change of thinking ?
2. Rewrite a traditional J2EE application using POJOs.

Number 2 probably depends on the application itself,
but what about number 1 ?
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 8943
Firefox Browser Spring Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

1. Change a traditional J2EE experienced programmer into a POJOs guru
Would it need a complete change of thinking ?



Why is it difficult ? In fact it is much easier to move to POJO.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1902
Hibernate Spring Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think #2 would depend largely not just on the application, but on the methodology used to write the initial application. (For instance, my company's moving to using servlets mostly as wrappers to expose/access POJOs as we're trying to keep open options for exposing similar functionality through web-services.)

As for #1, like all things, it depends on how entrenched the given developer is in their ways. Switching over to POJOs requires more a change in how one looks at the architecture of an application rather than any difficult leap in learning a technology.
 
author
Posts: 50
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Satou,

A previous post described how I went about converting an EJB application to a POJO application: https://coderanch.com/t/216014/ORM/java/Chris-POJO-POJO . The migration path does depend on the specifics of your application though.

On that project, developers readily picked up frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. They are, after all, a lot easier to use than EJB2.

Perhaps the biggest challenge is learning (or relearning) how to do object-oriented design. EJB2 really encouraged a procedural way of writing code, which can be a hard habit to break.

Chris
 
Christophe Verré
Sheriff
Posts: 14691
16
Eclipse IDE VI Editor Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
>Pradip
>Theodore


Why is it difficult ? In fact it is much easier to move to POJO.
Switching over to POJOs requires more a change in how one looks at the architecture of an application rather than any difficult leap in learning a technology.


I see. Understanding the concept as a whole is important.

>Chris
I'll read the thread you have posted

Thank you all for your replies.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dear all,

I am using two POJOs in my application, One is User and another is Salary.
And i am extending User in my Salary POJO, But one i try to query something in User POJO Hibernate throwing some errors like Property of User POJO is not there in Salary POJO.

Like userName is not a property of Salary POJO.

Why this happening, Is there any solution for this?

Thanks in Advance.

Cheenth.
 
Chris Richardson
author
Posts: 50
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Without seeing the the code, the Hibernate mappings, the query and the stack trace showing the error it is difficult to say that is going wrong.

Can you supply more information.

Chris
 
Sometimes you feel like a nut. Sometimes you feel like a tiny ad.
Sauce Labs - World's Largest Continuous Testing Cloud for Websites and Mobile Apps
https://coderanch.com/t/722574/Sauce-Labs-World-Largest-Continuous
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!