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parseFloat and Float.NaN??

 
Ranch Hand
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public float parseFloat( String s )
{
float f = 0.0f; // 1
try
{
f = Float.valueOf( s ).floatValue(); // 2
return f ; // 3
}
catch(NumberFormatException nfe)
{
f = Float.NaN ; // 4
return f; // 5
}
finally {
return f; // 6
}
return f ; // 7
}
I am finding these words new.
I dont understand what doed these words mean to say and wht is their output..
Can any one explain me in detail?
Sonir
 
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In your example, parseFloat is just an identifier that names a method.
just like in this line of code:
public static void main(String[] args)
the word "main" is an identifier and names this method.
NaN stands for "Not a number." It is part of the IEEE754 standard for dealing with floating point operations.
Basically, this allows for floating point operations without having to raise exceptional conditions.
For example, what is the result of this operation
double number = 0.0/0.0; //number is undefined!
double imaginary = Math.sqrt(-2.0); //not a "Real" number
The important point here is to remember that floating point operations NEVER result in any exceptions being thrown.
Rob
[ January 10, 2002: Message edited by: Rob Ross ]
 
Greenhorn
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You can always look up the documentation on Sun's site at
http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/api/index.html
Scroll through the box on bottom left, to find the class or interface you are looking for.
It lists ALL the fields and methods of all the classes.
Hope this helps.
 
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