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small doubt in declaration

 
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I know this question is very simple but i have a basic doubt.In the below code invade(7) what is the variable type..is 7 by default declared a int..

class Alien {
String invade(short ships) { return "a few"; }
String invade(short... ships) { return "many"; }
}
class Defender {
public static void main(String [] args) {
System.out.println(new Alien().invade(7));
} }
What is the result?
A. many
B. a few
C. Compilation fails.
D. The output is not predictable.
E. An exception is thrown at runtime.

Answer is: C is correct, compilation fails. The var-args declaration is fine, but invade takes a short,
so the argument 7 needs to be cast to a short. With the cast, the answer is B, 'a few'.
 
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Yes, whole number literals are ints, provided they are in the range of an int.
 
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Thats what you need to understand the difference between method invocation conversion and assignment conversion.

Assignment conversion includes the narrowing primitive conversions.
example: short s = 10; // no error
Method invocation conversion doesn't include the narrowing primitive conversions
example: method(short s) {} method(10); // compile time error
 
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