This week's book giveaway is in the Spring forum.
We're giving away four copies of Spring Boot in Practice and have Somnath Musib on-line!
See this thread for details.
Win a copy of Spring Boot in Practice this week in the Spring forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Tim Cooke
  • Ron McLeod
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Henry Wong
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Al Hobbs
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Mikalai Zaikin
  • Himai Minh

Agism in IT/Java jobs?

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi: I've had my own commercial website for five years, but want to move out into the IT job market. I plan to study Java and pass the certification exam. I'll be 61 years old by that time, and hope to add VB and C++ study and certs within a couple of years as well.
Anybody think I'd get hired at my age with the Java Programmer Certification? Will my self-employed web experience count as "experience?"
Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Tom
P.S. I should add that I live in the Seattle area, and would be able to(and prefer to) work here.

[This message has been edited by Thomas Brown (edited December 12, 2000).]
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 503
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tom:
I am 37 yrs old, grey hair, weigh 300 lbs, and am an ex tractor-trailer driver. Any single blonde chicks out there
Have I been discriminated against? Not sure. I was 35 when I finished the MS-CompSci degree. There are some games the big boys (Fortune 500 companies) like to play when interviewing at college campuses.
They all seem to have a 2 year "new employee development program", for college hires. Where they move you around the country - 6 months at a time. I have heard many times, that I was too experienced for these types of positions. I have even had recruiters at the college job fair hand my resume back to me saying I was "too experienced".
However, I have received job offers from these same companies (different divisions/recuiters) when interviewing at job fairs that the Philly News put on in downtown Philadelphia.
Most of the people I have interviewed with have been in the 35-45 yr old range. I have only been interviewed twice by 25 yr old "kids". Both times, they were professional, and I treated them with equal respect. Both times, I was invited for second interviews with more seasoned personel - unfortunately, did not get any offers from these companies.
I believe that if you treat people (any age) with respect - you will get that same respect in return. This is why I harped on the suite & tie bit in other posts on this board.
I would also say - don't try to act like a 25 yr old kid. If you don't watch MTV - don't try to pretend. No one likes a fake person. If you are married and have kids - it's ok to mention that at the interview (if it comes up) - just don't use it to "slam the other person" or play the "I am better that you" game. These kids (myself included) pick up on this immediately, and will tune you out.
If you treat a younger person with respect and on a preofessional level, and that person "blows you off" or considers you "an old fogey", then let that be a warning to you.
Remember, you are there to interview the company as much as the company is there to interview you.
----
There are ALOT of groups within companies consisting of 40-50 yr old people. This is where you may end up being placed. You may find it uncomfortable (on your part) to be a junior level person to let's say a 35 yr old - who is 30 yrs your junior. But if such a situation arises, treat him/her with respect - go in with a good attitude - and you may be surprised. Hell, he may even teach you how to drive a semi.
Good luck,
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
[This message has been edited by John Coxey (edited December 13, 2000).]
 
Thomas Brown
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey, John:
Thanks for your very thoughtful reply. I think I'll just try and be positive about the whole thing (like you are). If they need java people, then I'll get so good they'll HAVE to hire me --even if they're a young kid like you!
Tom
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1467
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One small thought came to my mind.
How old is Java? From which year it became so hot. May be 4 years. So if a person is so young in heart and has the energy to learn new technologies and wants to explore and make a switch in career, then can he/she become DIRECTLY JAVA ARCHITECT ?
I think it is good to start from programmer - developer - Architect. So there is more probablity for a 25 year old graduate straight from college be our collegue as java programmer/developer.
I always think in this way. Of course, the experience which we gain through ages will be a + point for an older person than a younger person. As long us we have the energy to learn and young in heart and good team player we can be with any group.
regds
maha anna

[This message has been edited by maha anna (edited December 14, 2000).]
 
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic