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am i doing the right thing ?

 
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Ok, well we all know how lousy the IT market is. My question is...am i doing the right thing by switching to focus all my attention on J2EE and Java development in general. I know this may be not the place to get an "unbiased" answer, but anyway...
Ive been doing VB & ASP "crap" for the last 5 years, and im just sick of it and havent really been fond of dotnet so far.
I guess what im wondering, is the J2EE marketplace going to shrink continually and when business picks up here in the US, will dotnet steal more of Java's thunder with each passing year ?
 
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One reason the gartner group gave that the stakeholders would favor M$ was a shortage of skilled java practitioners.
The recent court ruling that M$ must ship a JVM with Windows is sure to carry the java troops a little farther, if the courts allow it to stand.
J2EE knowledge transfers to .net. By and large this business is incremental evolution.
 
William Quantrill
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Originally posted by Rufus BugleWeed:

J2EE knowledge transfers to .net. By and large this business is incremental evolution.


The thing is...i DONT wnat to do dotnet. Ive been killing myself over the last 9 months or soreading C# and asp.net books. Ive done enough sample projects to get a pretty good feel of those areas. At least i can hit the ground running if i get tasked to assist.
Over the last 2 years or so, ive been slowly teaching myself various Java API's, focusing on J2EE. However, ive been swaying back-and-forth on whether to actually focus my career in that direction. The past few months however, has really brought me to the conclusion that i cant focus on both, so i decided to focus on the one i liked better. Java won
The other day, a friend asked me to explain myself(who is an M$ junkie just like i used to be), but i really couldnt. I dont hate Microsoft, but the love is gone...
FWIW, i think the Java software industry and J2EE applicaiton area in general has a bright future, its always been a somewhat smaller community than the Microsoft-centric community.
 
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Well, obviously there are many factors including your own personal interest, location, desired industries, etc. But as a general answer I would say it depends on how good you are.
Before I give my reason, let me preference it by saying I think that for good developers, the particular technology doesn't matter, as I just commented on here.
That being said look at the marketplace. Assuming two candidates (you and another person) otherwise equal, what will the experience show. There is currently a surplus of Java developers with 2-5 years experience, including in the J2EE space. You'll be coming in with less, so early on it will be difficult.
If you think you are a top notch programmer, and can take 1-3 years of difficulty finding jobs until you've gained enough experience and your resume shows off how great you are, then do it--I think Java has a birghter future for good developers, then VB and ASP. If you don't think you are, you might be better off leveraging your experience.

--Mark
 
William Quantrill
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Yes, im well aware that i will be competing with other more experienced developers, and im willing to accept the drop in pay etc...to gain the experience and get my foot in the door.
 
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