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Do we need to download both iis and tomcat to run jsp files

 
Greenhorn
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Do we need to download both iis and tomcat to run jsp files
 
Ranch Hand
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Welcome to JavaRanch anu rani,

Absouletly not. Internet Information Server (IIS) has nothing to do with JSP files. So no need to download both, just download Tomcat and deploy your project. Your files shall work smooth, hopefully

regarding Apache Tomcat there is link which is helpful to you.
Jakarta Tomcat for Servlet and JSP Development
[ August 29, 2006: Message edited by: Saif Uddin ]
 
author and cow tipper
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Just Tomcat.

In production you often put a web server in front of your middle tier, which would be Tomcat. You can use IIS, but you could just as well use Apache, another open source project.
 
Author and all-around good cowpoke
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I know of no good reason to not use Tomcat as a "production" server. Especially if your site uses JSP and/or servlets extensively, the extra steps involved in transferring request and response between IIS and Tomcat must surely be time consuming.
When I moved a client's app from a Win3k-IIS-tomcat configuration to pure tomcat they reported better response times.
As far as I am concerned the "dont use Tomcat for production" is just another annoying Java myth.
Bill
 
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Not so much a myth as good advise from the past that's become meaningless over time.
Early Tomcat versions were quite slow compared to the commercial servers, especially when serving static content.
Thus it was almost always better to host static content at say Apache and link that to Tomcat for dynamic content (or another servlet engine).
 
Sheriff
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Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:
Not so much a myth as good advise from the past that's become meaningless over time.



Agreed.

These days, depending on the nature of your app, Tomcat as a standalone can be faster and more efficent that the combination of webserver, connector, and app server.
 
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