Win a copy of Head First Android this week in the Android forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Ron McLeod
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Rob Spoor
  • Bear Bibeault
Saloon Keepers:
  • Jesse Silverman
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Al Hobbs
  • salvin francis

difference between page and request

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 31
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
what is the difference between page and request scope
prasanna
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 109
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
page - You can use the Bean within the JSP page with the
<jsp:useBean> element or any of the page's static include files, until the
page sends a response back to the client or forwards a request to another
file.

request - You can use the Bean from any JSP page processing the same
request, until a JSP page sends a response to the client or forwards the
request to another file. You can use the request object to access the Bean,
for example, request.getAttribute(beanInstanceName).



Basically, page and request scope both end when your JSP page finished
processing. So even if a FORM is sent to the client by JSP, when that FORM
is submitted it will be a new Request. I think the only difference between
page and request is if the bean persists between forward() calls.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hi,
Page Scope is the smallest scope, and is a representation of the PageContext object for your JSP. Each JSP has it's own page scope, so objects in the page scope of one JSP are not accessible to other JSPs. This is sorta like making a private variable in Java.

Request scope is the next smallest scope, and is represented with the JSP's request object. All JSPs and servlets that share a request share the request scope. For example, if I have a JSP that forwards to another page, and that second page includes a third JSP page, then all three pages are in the same request, and can share objects through the request scope. A special note here, is the response.redirect(), will create a new request, unlike forwards and includes. Also note, a new request is made every time the user gets a new page, be it by clicking a link, a button, or some JavaScript call.
 
You showed up just in time for the waffles! And this tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic